Atlas Shrugged, Part 3 Chapter 4: Anti-Life

Posted by nsnelson 8 years, 4 months ago to Books
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Summary: James Taggart contemplates the various People’s States dealing with decline, and Argentina planning to nationalize d’Anconia Copper. He tries to impress Cherryl, but she sees through him, and he proceeds to verbally abuse her. Cherryl visits Dagny, and discusses the situation. James Taggart and Lilian Rearden have an affair. Cherryl discusses it with James, and then she commits suicide.

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Atlas Shrugged was written by Ayn Rand in 1957.

My idea for this post is discussed here:

http://www.galtsgulchonline.com/posts...


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  • Posted by 8 years, 4 months ago
    Dagny to Cherryl: “Those who grant sympathy to guilt, grant none to innocence. Ask yourself which, of the two, are the unfeeling persons. And then you’ll see what motive is the opposite of charity.”
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  • Posted by 8 years, 4 months ago
    Dagny to Cherryl: “Whenever anyone accuses some person of being ‘unfeeling,’ he means that that person is just. He means that that person has no causeless emotions and will not grant him a feeling which he does not deserve.”
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  • Posted by 8 years, 4 months ago
    James to Cherryl: “Yes, I said gold-digger. There are many forms of it, other than greed for money, other and worse. You’re a gold-digger of the spirit. You didn’t marry me for my cash – but you married me for my ability or courage or whatever value it was that you set as the price of your love!”
    “Do you want … love … to be … causeless?”
    “Love is its own cause! Love is above causes and reasons. Love is blind. But you wouldn’t be capable of it. You have the mean, scheming, calculating little soul of a shopkeeper who trades, but never gives! Love is a gift – a great, free, unconditional gift that transcends and forgives everything. What’s the generosity of loving a man for his virtues? What do you give him? Nothing. It’s no more than cold justice. No more than he’s earned.”
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  • Posted by 8 years, 4 months ago
    James to Cherryl: “You should have considered my feelings first! That’s the first obligation of any wife – and of a woman in your position in particular! There’s nothing lower and uglier than ingratitude!”
    For the flash of one instant, she grasped the unthinkable fact of a man who was guilty and knew it and was trying to escape by inducing an emotion of guilt in his victim.
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  • Posted by 8 years, 4 months ago
    James to Cherryl: “You know,” he said suddenly, with a cold little chuckle, “if you’re so damn anxious to hide that you came from the slums, you ought to be less indifferent to the philosophy of social welfare. It’s always the poor who lack humanitarian instincts. One has to be born to wealth in order to know the finer feelings of altruism.”
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  • Posted by 8 years, 4 months ago
    “James Taggart reached into the pocket of his dinner jacket, pulled out the first wad of paper he found, which was a hundred-dollar bill, and dropped it into the beggar’s hand.
    He noticed that the beggar pocketed the money in a manner as indifferent as his own. “Thanks, bud,” said the beggar contemptuously, and walked away.
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