Atlas Shrugged, Part 2 Chapter 5: Account Overdrawn

Posted by nsnelson 8 years, 6 months ago to Books
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Summary: Rearden is unable to meet orders for his Metal, and much of the global economy is continuing to degrade. People are learning the harsh reality of scarce resources. The looters attempt to redistribute wealth, and vote to redistribute the Metal from the Rio Norte Line. Dagny visits with d’Anconia over that, Nat Taggart, and whether she should continue to fight. More heroes quit soon after the Rio Norte Line goes. James Taggart and Lillian Rearden continue to try to understand how to handle Hank and Dagny. Then Lillian meets Hank at the train station, sees Dagny there, and connects the dots that they are having an affair. Lillian demands that he breaks it off, and Hank absolutely refuses.

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Atlas Shrugged was written by Ayn Rand in 1957.

My idea for this post is discussed here:

http://www.galtsgulchonline.com/posts...


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  • Posted by 8 years, 6 months ago
    “You can’t have your cake and let your neighbor eat it, too,” said Francisco d’Anconia.
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    • Posted by 8 years, 6 months ago
      I love this quote! Once you eat it (or your neighbor does), you don’t have it anymore. I posted this on Facebook years ago, and some of my friends commented that they had never understood the common version of this saying until seeing it phrased this way.
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  • Posted by 8 years, 6 months ago
    Hank Rearden to Lillian: “Whatever claim you may have on me,” he said, “no human being can hold on another a claim demanding that he wipe himself out of existence.”
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  • Posted by 8 years, 6 months ago
    Lillian Rearden to Hank: “But I have the right to demand it! I own your life! It’s my property. My property – by your own oath. You swore to serve my happiness. Not yours – mine!”
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  • Posted by 8 years, 6 months ago
    Describing the crowded Marshville train platform: “At the end of the platform, a pallid, plumpish man stood saying to a crying woman, ‘That’s how it’s always been in this world. There will be no chance for the poor, until the rich are destroyed.’”
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  • Posted by 8 years, 6 months ago
    Describing the crowded Marshville train platform: “An unshaved young man with gold-rimmed glasses stood on a crate under an arc light, yelling to the faces shifting past him, ‘What do they mean, no business! Look at that train! It’s full of passengers! There’s plenty of business! It’s just that there’s no profits for them – that’s why they’re letting you perish, those greedy parasites!’”
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  • Posted by 8 years, 6 months ago
    d'Anconia to Dagny: “John Galt is Prometheus who changed his mind. After centuries of being torn by vultures in payment for having brought to men the fire of the gods, he broke his chains – and he withdrew his fire – until the day when men withdraw their vultures.”
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  • Posted by 8 years, 6 months ago
    d'Anconia to Dagny: His words came like a sudden explosion: “He was the only man – with one exception – to whom I could have given my life!”
    “Who is the exception?”
    “The man to whom I have.”
    “What do you mean?”
    He shook his head, as if he had said more than he intended, and did not answer.
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    • Posted by 8 years, 6 months ago
      They are talking about Rearden, and I suppose d’Anconia’s “exception” is John Galt. I’m curious about the expression, in light of the Objectivist vow. I don’t understand his willingness to give his life for the sake of another man (two others, I suppose).
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  • Posted by 8 years, 6 months ago
    Orren Boyle to the president of the Atlantic Southern Railroad: “I acted on the principle that need comes first. When in doubt, it’s the weak that must be considered, not the strong.”
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    • Posted by 8 years, 6 months ago
      An inverted morality: rewarding those who can't or won't work, penalizing those who do.

      Even if this is true in extreme cases (cf. Rand’s lecture on Emergencies), it should be voluntary, not coerced by the Government.
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