What is wnd.com?

Posted by Mamaemma 9 years ago to News
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Can someone tell me about the website wnd.com? I have been to the website but am unable to determine who is behind it. It is obvious it is a conservative site, but I would like to know more about it.
We get a lot of posts from this website, and I would like to know what their particular bias and purpose is. Any time I read an article, I always consider the source.


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  • Posted by Zenphamy 9 years ago
    Founded and run by Joseph Farah, a born again evangelical conservative, that had several years with a couple of decent newspapers in the 90's, then started WND in the mid to late 90's, as a far right news source. Has broken a few stories, but concentrates on anything anti-Obama and Christian.
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  • Posted by SaltyDog 9 years ago
    Back around the dawn of time, it was known as "World News Daily", and as khalling said, it was backed by Alex Jones. It's sort of like the National Enquirer in that they report on stuff that MSM shies away from, and they get it right just often enough that they can't be ignored.
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  • Posted by johnpe1 9 years ago
    since I am the one who posts most of the wnd stuff,
    please let me confess. . Mama confessor, please
    forgive me for I have sinned and fallen short. . I have
    posted things from wnd because I like to track the
    news from more than one source -- and I have Fox
    News on here in the bunker just about 24/7. . the
    particular bent of the evangelical folks and the
    pro-life folks is intriguing to me, since I live in a
    neighborhood of them. . and I have listened to
    Rush. . and I have checked Drudge. . and I like
    to check IJReview daily. . and I love the gulch,
    cuz there are so many reason-based people.
    so I will volunteer to say twenty "I Swears" if that
    will help. . yours truly, not-John-Galt-But-Just-Me. -- j
    .
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    • Posted by $ sjatkins 9 years ago
      Alex Jones stuff counts as "news"?? *boggles* He is heavy heavy into editorializing.
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      • Posted by Ibecame 9 years ago
        I check all of those news sources, and even those with the three letter acronyms. Of course I have a special definition for the "News" - Todays Lies and Propaganda.
        Show me a News outlet and I will show you the CEO and Board of Directors of a Corporation that has its own purpose.
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  • Posted by khalling 9 years ago
    Alex Jones is behind the site. In the past, it has been known as a conspiracy site with dubious claims and cites to "facts." However, it is a quite popular site and I think since the last election has done some important reporting on stuff you will not get from the mainstream media. However, the taint of the past on dubious claims and mis-information has remained. Drudge does run articles from this site at least a couple or more times a week. A case of articles and reporting coming first from this site includes the coverage of the Bundy Ranch stand-off. I felt the reporting was solid. There are many gulchers who have no use for this site. I only reference the site if I can find another source I trust to corroborate. It's easy to get burned.
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  • Posted by DeanStriker 9 years ago
    WND.com is yes, Joseph Farah, and Alex Jones, and Jerome Corsi. I formerly subscribed to the site, but finally gave it up after seeing that most everything is somehow "justified" by religion rather than Reason. That's not to say that it's entirely on the wrong side of issues. Among other things, they wrote much about Pseudo-Prez and all that's tied into that, very good, but no good came from that, did it?
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  • Posted by starznbarz 9 years ago
    WND is the outfit behind the banner planes flying over the presidential debates in 2012 with "Where`s the birth certificate" on the banners. If you are looking for a quick view of the daily news, give us a try, our FB page is updated with timely news links early every morning and original writing on our main site posted as I have time to write. http://4thestatemedia.com/?p=403
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  • Posted by samreginab 9 years ago
    WND definitely has a rep as a conspiracy theorist site. Trouble is, most of the blasted conspiracy theories are coming to pass. Some days I feel like the Overton window shifts every week. Next SOTUS and the Pope will be sanctifying marriage to other species. This is not the world I grew up in. I liked the old one a lot better. Russians with nukes in Cuba was relaxing compared to ISIS. Kruschev was a codger but reasonable by comparison.
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  • Posted by bsmith51 9 years ago
    A source for popups, malware, scripts and computer freezes, I think it's a junk advertising site cleverly disguised as a news and information site.
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  • Posted by $ MichaelAarethun 9 years ago
    Just to add a few.

    Gringo - from the song Green Grow The Rushes and also there was some militia unit dressed in green - as seen the lens of being Mexican.

    WOP - With Out Papers. Immigrants coming in through Ellis Island had that notation and most were from Italy.

    Kike - Yiddish name for the Star of David also a notation for immigrants.

    GRIT - Girl raised in the South always singular.
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  • -4
    Posted by CircuitGuy 9 years ago
    It comes off as a parody of rednecks, but I think it may be serious.
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    • Posted by khalling 9 years ago
      what exactly do you define a "redneck" as?
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      • -4
        Posted by CircuitGuy 9 years ago
        Rural, unsophisticated, and angry.
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        • Posted by Technocracy 9 years ago
          So what new label do you have for liberals that are...

          Urban, over educated, and angry ?
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          • Posted by CircuitGuy 9 years ago
            The opposite would be "urban, educated in academics rather than the practical, and sanctimonious." I do not know any slur for these people. There's Coasties, FIBs, near-east-siders, old-school liberals.

            I fancy myself part redneck because I like guns, sleds / motorcycles, and grilling non-vegetarian brats. My wife, who is part redneck but went to law school and lived on the East Coast for a few years, is quick to tell me I'm closer to a near-east-sider than a redneck.
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            • Posted by khalling 9 years ago
              since academia has been fundamentally changed since the 20s, I'm not sure what an "education" really means nowadays.

              I have never seen more mean-spirited, spitting angry people than the progs. Every time the first lady speaks, she's mad and resentful, for example. watch one social justice warrior on MSNBC. spitting hatred.
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              • Posted by CircuitGuy 9 years ago
                That whole channel and some other news channels are just talking heads yelling at each other. That gym membership ended, so I don't see them anymore. My kids still act like that sometimes, though. I hope they grow out of it and don't go into the bickering-as-entertainment industry.
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                • Posted by khalling 9 years ago
                  what about the first lady of the united states?
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                  • Posted by CircuitGuy 8 years, 12 months ago
                    "what about the first lady of the united states?"
                    I just read the excerpt. I agree with all of it until the last two paragraphs.

                    In the beginning she says people will judge you unfairly sometimes and sometimes that makes life really hard. That's true.

                    I don't get why her answer is to band together and vote. My advice would just don't get caught up with those people. It's the same principle as if your kid were hanging around many kids doing stuff you don't agree with. The solution is not to fix all those people who are misbehaving- just don't get involved with them. It should be the same with adults, but we often have employers, employees, vendors, clients, board members, or friends who are doing something wrong, we keep trying to change them instead of working with people we work well with.

                    My guess is the band-together-and-vote message comes from the fact that that's the industry she's in. Whatever ails you, the first solution that comes to mind is "vote". It would be nice if her thought was voting won't solve this problem because it's outside the purview of gov't. I *do not* sense what she's saying is related to petty ideological bickering.
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                  • -4
                    Posted by CircuitGuy 9 years ago
                    The few clips I've seen of her were positive. I have not followed her.
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                    • Posted by khalling 9 years ago
                      she just spoke to a university for commencement-told them she felt alienated in her own country. that America didn't make her feel welcome. that she was uncomfortable visiting a museum in Chicago because she was Black. this from a woman who has enjoyed huge opportunities in life including going to top schools in the country. yea, her life has sucked and she has been abused. taking a shower now
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                    • Posted by khalling 9 years ago
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                      • Posted by NealS 8 years, 12 months ago
                        That is a man that knows what he is talking about, or is it just that I agree with everything he says? In any case he should apply for (or run against) Al Sharpton's job. At least he might turn some of them around. Maybe he's really a cop in disguise. I'm sure he's been labeled a racist already. I just hope he can get a big audience. He's just like Dr. Ben Carson only comes across with a little more authority.
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                      • Posted by CircuitGuy 8 years, 12 months ago
                        Thanks. Do you have a link to the controversial comments themselves?
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                        • Posted by khalling 8 years, 12 months ago
                          cite: whitehouse.gov ( https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-off... ) full speech (exerpt for specific comments):

                          "Because here’s the thing -- the road ahead is not going to be easy. It never is, especially for folks like you and me. Because while we’ve come so far, the truth is that those age-old problems are stubborn and they haven’t fully gone away. So there will be times, just like for those Airmen, when you feel like folks look right past you, or they see just a fraction of who you really are.

                          The world won’t always see you in those caps and gowns. They won’t know how hard you worked and how much you sacrificed to make it to this day -- the countless hours you spent studying to get this diploma, the multiple jobs you worked to pay for school, the times you had to drive home and take care of your grandma, the evenings you gave up to volunteer at a food bank or organize a campus fundraiser. They don't know that part of you.

                          Instead they will make assumptions about who they think you are based on their limited notion of the world. And my husband and I know how frustrating that experience can be. We’ve both felt the sting of those daily slights throughout our entire lives -- the folks who crossed the street in fear of their safety; the clerks who kept a close eye on us in all those department stores; the people at formal events who assumed we were the “help” -- and those who have questioned our intelligence, our honesty, even our love of this country.

                          And I know that these little indignities are obviously nothing compared to what folks across the country are dealing with every single day -- those nagging worries that you’re going to get stopped or pulled over for absolutely no reason; the fear that your job application will be overlooked because of the way your name sounds; the agony of sending your kids to schools that may no longer be separate, but are far from equal; the realization that no matter how far you rise in life, how hard you work to be a good person, a good parent, a good citizen -- for some folks, it will never be enough. (Applause.)

                          And all of that is going to be a heavy burden to carry. It can feel isolating. It can make you feel like your life somehow doesn’t matter -- that you’re like the invisible man that Tuskegee grad Ralph Ellison wrote about all those years ago. And as we’ve seen over the past few years, those feelings are real. They’re rooted in decades of structural challenges that have made too many folks feel frustrated and invisible. And those feelings are playing out in communities like Baltimore and Ferguson and so many others across this country. (Applause.)

                          But, graduates, today, I want to be very clear that those feelings are not an excuse to just throw up our hands and give up. (Applause.) Not an excuse. They are not an excuse to lose hope. To succumb to feelings of despair and anger only means that in the end, we lose.

                          But here’s the thing -- our history provides us with a better story, a better blueprint for how we can win. It teaches us that when we pull ourselves out of those lowest emotional depths, and we channel our frustrations into studying and organizing and banding together -- then we can build ourselves and our communities up. We can take on those deep-rooted problems, and together -- together -- we can overcome anything that stands in our way.

                          And the first thing we have to do is vote. (Applause.) Hey, no, not just once in a while. Not just when my husband or somebody you like is on the ballot. But in every election at every level, all of the time. (Applause.) Because here is the truth -- if you want to have a say in your community, if you truly want the power to control your own destiny, then you’ve got to be involved. You got to be at the table. You’ve got to vote, vote, vote, vote. That’s it; that's the way we move forward. That’s how we make progress for ourselves and for our country. "
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            • Posted by Zenphamy 9 years ago
              The opposite would be 'sissified, metro-sexual, educated in feminism and sociology, fearful of nature and reality, and egotistical.'

              Redneck entered the vocabulary as a 'nickname' for a large group of miners in the early battles for unionization of coal mining in Appalachia. Those men wore a red kerchief around their necks for identification in battles against the mine thugs.
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              • Posted by $ puzzlelady 8 years, 12 months ago
                Actually, it refers to manual laborers who worked outdoors, farmers and construction workers whose necks got sun-burned. Mildly offensive term for a lower class white person from the southeastern states of the USA. The butt of many jokes, usually beginning with "You know you're a redneck if you... "
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                • Posted by Zenphamy 8 years, 12 months ago
                  Well, it looks like we've both got some points:
                  From Wikipedia: "Coal miners
                  The term "redneck" in the early 20th century was occasionally used in reference to American coal miner union members who wore red bandannas for solidarity.

                  The United Mine Workers of America (UMW) and rival miners' unions used the red bandana, in order to build multiracial unions of white, black, and immigrant miners in the strike-ridden coalfields of northern and central Appalachia between 1912 and 1936. The origin of redneck to mean "a union man" or "a striker" remains uncertain, but according to linguist David W. Maurer, the former definition of the word probably dates at least to the 1910s, if not earlier. The use of redneck to designate "a union member" was especially popular during the 1920s and 1930s in the coal-producing regions of West Virginia, Kentucky, and Pennsylvania.[16

                  Outside the United States
                  Historical Scottish Covenanter usage
                  In Scotland in the 1640s, the Covenanters rejected rule by bishops, often signing manifestos using their own blood. Some wore red cloth around their neck to signify their position, and were called rednecks by the Scottish ruling class to denote that they were the rebels in what came to be known as The Bishop's War that preceded the rise of Cromwell.[21][22] Eventually, the term began to mean simply "Presbyterian", especially in communities along the Scottish border. Because of the large number of Scottish immigrants in the pre-revolutionary American South, some historians have suggested that this may be the origin of the term in the United States.[23]

                  Dictionaries document the earliest American citation of the term's use for Presbyterians in 1830, as "a name bestowed upon the Presbyterians of Fayetteville [North Carolina]".[10][22]"

                  It appears that the term originated in Scotland in The Bishop's War and came to the states, primarily the Carolinas, with the Presbyterian Scottish that settled throughout the Appalachians, through a couple of other identifications, and then to the Miners in the early 1900's.
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                  • Posted by $ puzzlelady 8 years, 12 months ago
                    Thanks for the language and history research, Zen, always a fascinating topic for me, since words and thoughts (ideas) are so intertwined. Meanings also migrate to new contexts. "Red" came into full bloom with the Communists' partisanship of the laboring classes. Those leaning in that direction, only a little bit red, became "pinkos".

                    Nowadays I do think the sunburned necks have the strongest claim.

                    Colors can be powerfully symbolic. The new movement, World Beyond War, uses blue scarves in their activism.

                    Not sure how this topic drift answers Mamaemma's original question about wnd.com, though perhaps political activism embraces both.
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              • Posted by CircuitGuy 8 years, 12 months ago
                I'm in a mixed marriage. So our kids will be both. We actually speak non-redneck in the home, except for sometimes when they're in trouble and mom slips into redneck. So our kids will probably be non-redneck, sisified, or whatever we're calling it, unless they rebel.
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        • Posted by Zenphamy 9 years ago
          Unsophisticated? What does that mean to you? Not a liberal, not a progressive, not a socialist?
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          • Posted by CircuitGuy 8 years, 12 months ago
            "Unsophisticated? What does that mean to you? Not a liberal, not a progressive, not a socialist?"
            Politicians tie these things (sophisticated/unsophisticated, egghead/philistine, urban/rural) to ideologies like the ones you mentioned to get attention and get elected. It gets attention when walking by a TV during a busy day. Some small fraction actually gets duped and thinks it's real and that these philistines or eggheads are actually evil or associated with socialism, fascism, etc.
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