The God of the Machine - Tranche 39

Posted by mshupe 8 months, 2 weeks ago to Economics
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Chapter XVIII, Excerpt 3 of 3
Why Real Money is Indispensable

The most dangerous fallacy which has been put forward recently pretends to find an argument in the German war gamble. Germany is “winning the war because it has been fighting with an industrial and engineering economy,” while Allies “have been fighting with a money, or financial economy.” Described as “taking the heavy financial boot off the brakes and letting the productive machinery run free . . . liberated machines will always beat liberated money.”

Mental savagery is again evident. The idea is nonsense. A machine cannot be enslaved or liberated; the terms apply only to human beings. All the resources that Germany is using were produced by a money economy. Resources were embezzled . . . it was the actions of governments elsewhere which enabled Germany to embezzle on such an extensive scale. Also in Russia, the machinery had to be supplied from money economies elsewhere and paid for in gold.

No group, as a group, has any intelligence. All intelligence is in individuals. Under state ownership, what engineers and labor can accomplish is to build ponderous masses of rock. Money is the means by which individuals can be brought together in free cooperation on large, productive enterprises. Money is the only means by which machinery can be invented or used at all. Private property, money, freedom, engineering, and industry are all one system. When one element is taken out, the rest must collapse.


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  • Posted by j_IR1776wg 8 months, 2 weeks ago
    The psychological mindset of a Determinist is that of a tantrum throwing child insisting that reality configure and conform itself to match his desires. Children, eventually, grow up, and realize that their survival depends on their understanding and integration of the evidence of their senses. “Nature, to be commanded, must be obeyed.” Francis Bacon

    Determinists do not grow up. They reach adulthood sincerely believing that the failure of their ideas in practice does not lie within themselves, but, rather, is caused by the combination of stupid People and inflexible Natural Laws. The dream never ends. If only I/we were in complete charge of everything and everybody, life on Earth would be perfect. Utopia finally achieved!
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    • Posted by 8 months, 2 weeks ago
      For what its worth, I'm not sure the first paragraph is accurate. Sure, a determinist rejects free will and responsibilty in favor of emotionalism, but cannot expect anyone or anything to conform. I think they merely deflect blame, having rejected causality.
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      • Posted by j_IR1776wg 8 months, 2 weeks ago
        We can agree to disagree for now while I attempt to express my thoughts more clearly.
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        • Posted by 8 months, 2 weeks ago
          I think your comments we mostly good, just a technical issue with the first sentence. Having said that, children do not necessarily grow up. The productive ones learn to be rational in their careers, but the contradictions never go away. I'm married to someone who stopped thinking at age 13 and is now the equivalent of a special needs child. That is what the 1960s did to a shitload of public school students.
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          • Posted by j_IR1776wg 8 months, 2 weeks ago
            You are correct. I should have begun that sentence "Most children, eventually, grow up..." as opposed to the inferred [All] "Children, eventually grow up..."

            Logically more precise.
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            • Posted by 8 months, 2 weeks ago
              Thanks, and this morning I read something on the subject that hit home. Paraphrasing, it said, when speaking philosophically it's necessary to use exact language.
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              • Posted by j_IR1776wg 8 months, 2 weeks ago
                Yes necessary and sadly lacking in today's America. Even among those of us who know better. Discipline, discipline, discipline.
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                • Posted by 8 months, 2 weeks ago
                  Sadly, sadly lacking by design. To me, this book does a good job identifying the problem: the degradation of definitions for the purpose of debasing concepts. Paterson calls it a return to primitivism and savargery. That is the authoritarian goal, a passive, conformist population. We both see it every day, but must not beat ourselves up; only stay in the appropriate level of focus.
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  • Posted by 8 months, 2 weeks ago
    The first paragraph is the determinist view of life, and in this case, the natural consequence was appeasement of Nazi means and methods. The second paragraph exposes the criminal activity that the appeasement was covering. The last sentence, "Private property, money, freedom, engineering, and industry are all one system. When one element is taken out, the rest must collapse." This powerful conclusion is also a metaphor for any great, complex system: the universe, the human organism, Objectivism.
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  • Posted by VetteGuy 8 months, 2 weeks ago
    Another part of this chapter I found interesting was IP's description of the evolution of the automobile from "lumbering contrivance nobody could want" to "luxury" to mass production of automobiles that most could afford.

    The parallel with today's EVs is obvious. The first EVs (anybody remember CitiCars?) were little more than golf carts. Now we are at the point where they are baubles for the rich. Eventually, I think they could be practical for specific purposes, such as a car for commuting or running errands around town. Longer road trips? Not so sure.

    A major difference is that at the dawn of the automobile, the government wasn't threatening to outlaw horses.
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    • Posted by 8 months, 2 weeks ago
      Actually, I think the comparison with EVs is purely coincidental. Autos evolved by voluntary market forces, meaning the profit motive. The EV market today is the result of force. There is no profit motive. Any compromise with these fascists will backfire. The insanity of this energy circuit will blow up badly.
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