Galt's Gulch Chile, expat community, Atlas Shrugged, Ayn Rand

Posted by UncommonSense 8 years, 3 months ago to Culture
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I just discovered this tonight. Did any of you Gulchers know about this?
SOURCE URL: http://galtsgulchchile.com/


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  • Posted by overmanwarrior 8 years, 3 months ago
    I knew about this deal in Chili and I think they have the right intent. But I don't think such a place can stay visible in a country like Chili and survive. Right now, I'm sure Chili is willing to give away the kitchen sink to attract a society of wealthy people to leave their countries and plant themsevles in an empty field under their control. It's kind of like a man who will tell a woman anything to get her to sleep with him, without having a plan as to what to say when she discovers that he's not what he sold her the night before. Chili will most likely pull the deal a few years down the road.
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    • Posted by 8 years, 3 months ago
      Are you trying to tell me, 'this isn't the gulch I'm looking for?' :)

      Thanks for the intel brief. Meanwhile, living on Bora Bora is just a dream...
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        • Posted by $ ObjectiveAnalyst 8 years, 3 months ago
          We we Misure! But even the French once had their limits, their Bastille Day. What happened?
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            • Posted by $ ObjectiveAnalyst 8 years, 3 months ago
              Yes, the impatience with the Girondins brought about the excesses and repercussions of Robespierre and the Jacobites, and then an even worse status at the hands of people like Vadier, Bilaud-Varenne, Elie Lacoste… Though the people were tired of the terror they were swayed by the same populist, egalitarian arguments we hear. In the end they replaced one tyranny for another. There was a moment in time when they could have moved beyond… When the moment arrives one must take hold and not let go!
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              • Posted by 8 years, 3 months ago
                You know what bothers me? Who in our current gov't are the Robespierre's/Jacobins Club-types (after the good people had the sense to leave it), Vadier, et al? I can name a few, but it would be interesting to compare todays political moron's and their philosophy and match it with their French counterparts of the late 18th century.
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  • Posted by Matcha 6 years, 8 months ago
    I have relocated to Chile with my husband. We have been here 3 months. My daughter, her husband and her daughter have been here over a year. I feel very at home. I consider this my new country. The people are very nice and Santiago is very much a modern city. I still love America but I just couldn't live with the changes. You need to really do your research because leaving your country is a big deal. It takes a lot of preparation. Simon Black is a good source. Expat blogs are good too. I have no regrets. I was sort of depressed the last few years in America. There are no property taxes on agricultural property in Chile. Gas is high but you don't need a car in Santiago. Bank accounts are hard to get. You have to wait a year to work unless you start a business. There are people here to help you with everything. You have to have a little money. I don't miss anything.
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  • Posted by jyokela 7 years, 5 months ago
    They are doing visits. I would like to visit and see it for myself. I would not buy anything, but would see if it would be possible to work/rent, maybe with some infrastructure. If I felt stable after a few years, then I might consider buying.
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  • Posted by NoMoreCages 8 years, 3 months ago
    We are in the very beginning stages of putting a deal together, but I invite each of you to check out

    www.porcupinevillage.com

    My partner and I are in discussions with RE Agents in Costa Rica at present, but are also looking for opportunities in Belize, Chile, Uruguay, Panama, Honduras, Nicaragua, Ecuador... community sizes that we're looking at are ranging between 100 acres and 940 acres... Check out the site for more!!
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    • Posted by khalling 8 years, 3 months ago
      Again, Costa Rica is a highly socialist country. it ranks way below the US. What is your rationale for there? Quepos is pretty? it's relatively cheap? it brings in lots of tourists already?
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      • Posted by NoMoreCages 8 years, 3 months ago
        While it's true that Costa Rica is a socialist country, they also have no standing army. Their tax policies concerning foreign-earned income are rather favorable (not quite as nice as Panama, but...), as are the property tax policies toward corporately-owned property, as you have to buy them being a foreigner. Additionally, Costa Rica produces 90% of it's energy needs from hydroelectric, has extremely fertile soil, plenty of rainfall... You ignored the other countries I listed... Not sure why.
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        • Posted by khalling 8 years, 3 months ago
          didn't mean to, just looked at the website and responded to what was listed there that I saw. I like that Belize has british common law, but it is a very corrupt govt, with lots of minutia that must be attended to in only one city in the entire country. I would be interested in knowing where you were looking there, just for curiosity sake. I didn't see from the site any information on the other countries. also, my comments on this thread stand about owning property during a very precarious global financial situation. the idea of a gulch subdivision seems , well, weird. but by all means, make your case for it.
          I did not knock a point off for your 1st comment btw
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      • Posted by 8 years, 3 months ago
        unless it's Bora Bora, I won't bother in going there to live. I could live in BB, but the chances of that are when I win the powerball or megamillions. Since I don't play that often, that mean I'll never live in BB.
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        • Posted by khalling 8 years, 3 months ago
          When one looks at the over reaching global financial crisis that seems inevitable, I am curious about expats who start with the premise" I must own land." especially if they aren't that familiar with the country they might purchase the land in! and by familiar, I mean not only really familiar, but also the vetting of many other locations. now, spending time outside the US I totally understand. but this "subdivision" mentality of galting, seems to miss. IT "communities" in this day and age allow for strong relationships, economic and social, worldwide, negating the need for geographic closeness. But, I understand why people are looking at leaving and why others would look for business opportunities within that niche
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          • Posted by NoMoreCages 8 years, 3 months ago
            A lot of people do not have the time or money to globe trot and stay in foreign countries long enough to make a determination about whether one place or another is a good place to live. But, like with finances, investments etc, we pay attention to people who have used some of their wealth to visit other countries and talk about what it's like to live there. Argentina isn't known for the stability of government, but Doug Casey went ahead and built La Estancia de Cafayate there, and it has performed extremely well. Jeff Berwick in Acapulco and in Chile... You can harp about your disagreement with those choices and take solace in the fact that no one is forcing you to move to any of those places. But I would wager that you're not anywhere near as familiar with these developments as you are your talking points against them. No place is perfect.

            As far as owning land goes, it's one way to ensure you have the right and ability to make the land produce what you need to survive; food, livestock, sale crops, well-water, and provide you a place you can capitalize on natural energy sources like solar, geothermal and hydroelectric so that, when the collapse occurs, you don't go hungry or have to live like a caveman.
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            • Posted by khalling 8 years, 3 months ago
              I understand there is no one perfect place for everyone.
              as far as owning land goes, when the fabric of society falls apart, legal ownership has very little meaning and does not give you the ability to doe the things you talk about. property rights depend on the fact they will be govt respected/enforced. I'm not saying this isn't an option for many, but when society breaks down, weigh chances. one cannot pick up land and move it with them. many govts rely on this fact as a way to enslave. just my opinion-good luck with your endeavors
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