How About the Dogs?

Posted by Abaco 1 month, 2 weeks ago to Culture
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Let's hear about your dogs. Cat's can be talked about too. Just don't let my dog hear about it. For a few years now I've really understood how dogs got the descriptor of "man's best friend". I am on my 2nd aussie cattle dog. I don't buy from breeders, ever. But, I rescue. Finding one to rescue can be a challenge because they don't last in a shelter long. They're amazing animals and companions. Our current one took, literally, months to really accept his new family/home situation. I could see the slow transition of him warming to his new surroundings. Now he's all in...the first to greet me at the door when I come home - very affectionate.


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  • Posted by DrZarkov99 1 month, 2 weeks ago
    We used to have standard poodles - incredibly intelligent animals. The big white male had great instincts, and could recognize an untrustworthy person instantly. He shocked a couple of aggressive types who were not expecting a big fluffy dog to act as a security system. At the same time, he was incredibly patient with little kids, and several learned to walk by hanging on to his fur. I always say that I hope to be as good a man as he was a dog.

    We've since downsized to a female Maltese and a male Havanese, rescued together, since they'd been companions since they were puppies. The Maltese has become the "other woman," climbing on to my chest and staring adoringly into my eyes. She's also our alarm system, with an ear piercing yelp that would wake the dead. The Havanese, all 10 pounds of him, is my wife's guard dog, challenging all who approach her. Once they realize we welcome someone, they become the greeting party.
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  • Posted by dukem 1 month, 2 weeks ago
    So to be totally politically incorrect, I'll take a dog (my dog, any of them, of course) over a human any day. Really. They have all the right qualities, never correct me, are always faithful, laugh at my jokes (I think), and don't nag, I have other beings around to do the things my dog doesn't do. Now, the cat . . . . that's another story.
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    • Posted by $ exceller 1 month, 1 week ago
      "So to be totally politically incorrect, I'll take a dog (my dog, any of them, of course) over a human any day."

      That makes the two of us (at least). I have been getting flak for my belief and do not broadcast it in an environment where it may backfire among the "just an animal" crowd.

      Dogs and some cat breeds are exceptional b/c they are without vice. That is why we love them. You would never be backstabbed or betrayed by a loyal animal friend.

      About nagging: don't know what you are referring to. We have had several generations of Abyssinian cats but they never bothered us with their problems, regardless. Same with the Rough Collie, Lassie we had the good fortune to own a long time ago.

      They never complained, even when in pain. I know there were times they had pain but they never cried about it. They tolerated in silently.

      If humans had only a fractions of the attributes these animals possess, this world would be a much more pleasant place to live in.
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    • Posted by 1 month, 2 weeks ago
      My aussie nags. He's relentless if he gets bored, which is pretty common with the breed. It usually revolves around a ball in his mouth and how I'm supposed to go outside and throw it for him. Of course, I can't do that 24/7 so we have disagreements. I can either put the ball up, blast this pet corrector air horn (which I barely hear but dogs don't like), or buckle. Anymore I just have to point to the blaster and he leaves me alone enough to get done whatever I'm working on. This past weekend I looked at him and somewhat angrily said, "I said no dammit." He walked over from his ball, put his paws on my shoulders and gave me love as if to say, "Sorry dad."
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  • Posted by $ 25n56il4 1 month, 2 weeks ago
    Have you ever owned a talking Pug? My Sam lived to be 17 years old. He could say 'help, mama, 'out', and lemmeout'. One day a medical caseworker came to check on my disabled veteran son and Sam was locked in a bedroom. I had to take the caseworker into the bedroom so she would know I wasn't holding someone prisoner in my home. He was yelling 'help' and 'lemmeout' and 'mama'!
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    • Posted by $ 25n56il4 1 month, 2 weeks ago
      He wasn't unusual. The lady that did 'Pug Rescue' called me one day and asked if I would pick up a lady Pug at the Vet. When I got to her house, I offered her $200 if she wouldn't make me adopt her. That dog talked all the way to her home.
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  • Posted by Herb7734 1 month, 2 weeks ago
    I have a rescued beagle. Why anyone would just abandon such a beautiful creature is way beyond my ability to comprehend.Like you, I only have had rescue dogs. As it happens, this one is likely to be my last one and as it turns out, she is the best one.
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    • Posted by $ exceller 1 month, 1 week ago
      Beagle is the breed used by Pharma companies to test their drugs on.

      I had a serious issue with that when I worked for a biotech firm engaged in testing and had to sit through meetings where their status was reported. They are exposed to this torture from age 6 months.

      One of my colleagues rescued one of them.

      Animal testing should be banned with no exception. The sanctimonious Swiss voted against the ban since they have a huge interest in the Pharma sector, with several global HQs operating in Switzerland. When it comes to their well being, all humanitarian aspects are gone out the window.
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    • Posted by Shrugging1947 1 month, 1 week ago
      Yes, what Herb said, word for word. I am a "failed Foster" from Beagle Rescue. Had to keep every one I tried to Foster. I'm down to what will probably be my last. He's my heart, and at 15 1/2 with heart problems, I worry daily. Could never replace him, but don't know if I could live without a dog. And then there's Franny-Cat, red Tortie, another rescue. She's about 4 now, and makes me and my Munchkin dog CRAZY! She thinks she owns the place. We're still negotiating!
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  • Posted by term2 1 month, 2 weeks ago
    I have two rescue pit bulls. They are very affectionate and great animals (not like the typical description of pit bulls at all). They are both males and they get along great- its all about how you treat them and what you expect from them.

    Early experiences do seem to have lasting effects. One of them was just dumped off on a remote road and left to fend for himself. Its 9 months later now, but he still gets very concerned when we leave the house and he stays behind. I think he still remembers being abandoned . He is getting better about it now, as we always return.

    I would say that this is one of the difficulties of adopting rescued pets, but I do think the pets appreciate a good home now that they have one.
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    • Posted by 1 month, 2 weeks ago
      I've seen a mixed bag with pits. I know one that's a rescue and the owner has it on prozac(?). It's nutty. My neighbors have a really beautiful, brown pit female. She's very sweet and insists on giving me smooches every time she sees me. She's great with kids, too, and very intelligent.
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      • Posted by term2 1 month, 2 weeks ago
        my guess is that its part genetic, and part how they were raised during their 'socialization period" when puppies. They are incredibly strong which makes it more important to raise them right.
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  • Posted by $ exceller 1 month, 2 weeks ago
    We had a Border Collie several years ago.

    He was an amazingly intelligent friend and companion. He never barked except once. They say Collies never bark unless they have a reason to.

    It was Winter, with the paths covered in ice around the house. I woke up in the middle of the night hearing Lassie bark. It was incredible so I got up to investigate. Then I heard footsteps and the ice cracking. Someone was moving around the house and Lassie was warning us.

    We no longer have him.

    Now it is Abyssinian cats, filling the void with equal intelligence. They come when you call them (popular belief that cats don't answer calls. These ones do) Every time they hear movement outside they jump up and listen, sometimes growl, ready to attack.

    They definitely dislike moves. In fact, one of them had a heart attack and died shortly after we moved. But his sibling took to it as a good little trooper, so it probably is a function of individual predilections.

    .
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    • Posted by term2 1 month, 2 weeks ago
      When I come home, I always meeoow and am met by a corresponding meeoow from my british blue cat I named sematary after the cat in the movie. That way, he knows when I am home, and I know he is ok.
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      • Posted by $ exceller 1 month, 2 weeks ago
        The British Blue looks like the Russian Blue.

        I adopted a Russian Blue seven months ago. My first experience with this bred, having had Abyssinians before.

        She is an absolute pain when trying to hold her or stroke her: she cries when I lift her up. It is not as bad now as it used to be but still, her behavior is the striking opposite of the Abys.

        Recently she added to the fun by exhibiting a decisively choosy and finicky attitude to food, by simply refusing to eat what I present her with.
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        • Posted by term2 1 month, 2 weeks ago
          Sematary is happy with being held and picked up. Very insistent on special wet food in the morning (early). Has a series of very different meeoows depending on what he is trying to communicate.

          I think part of their behavior is genetic, part of it is how they are socialized when in the "socialization period" as kittens, and then later on as a result of the expectation and behavior of the owner. I got sematary from a breeder at about 6 weeks of age and have had him ever since. Sematary is very curious and has to inspect anything that enters the house. He also loves cardboard boxes for some strange reason, and bosses around the two pit bulls I have also. dogs have owners; cats have staff.
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          • Posted by $ exceller 1 month, 2 weeks ago
            Yes, I think you are correct.

            I got my Abys from breeders but Hera, my Russian Blue was adopted at 6 mo of age. Similar with any animal, early training and conditioning are critical as to their behavior later.

            When I took her home, she was much wilder than she is now. I attributed that behavior to her being traumatized. Who knows what conditions she has been exposed to. Being shy by nature, she has a long time building up trust in people. When I get a chance to hold her, I keep sweet talking to her and stroking her. She likes it and she is mellowing by an inch every day, although she will probably never be as friendly as my Abys were.

            I searched the web for Russian Blue traits. One entry said the same thing: the owner said one stroke on the head, no matter how loving, and his cat is not seen for two days, hiding, She hides all the time.
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            • Posted by term2 1 month, 1 week ago
              Funny- Sematary likes to "hide" in plain sight- especially when he knows I am looking for him. He blends in with gray furniture and just sits there and looks at me without moving so I cant see him.
              They are smart when it comes to getting what they want- thats for sure
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  • Posted by freedomforall 1 month, 2 weeks ago
    Smart dogs, Aussie cattle dogs. When in Willunga, South Australia we stopped at a plant nursery that had acres of land under cultivation. They had their dog take us on a tour through the property to be sure we didn't stray from the paths or take a wrong turn. https://proteaworld.com.au/
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_co...
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    • Posted by 1 month, 2 weeks ago
      They are sharp, and very proactive about keeping order. We've found ways to entertain each other with that. My son's friends will be over and I'll go, "Hey watch this!" and I start to walk away in some goofy manner...some goofy march. And, our dog is on me immediately - barking, nipping my heals as if to say, "Cut that out! Stop acting like a fool!" It's really funny. This boy is surely bred to work. I'd like to see him around livestock.
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  • Posted by $ Thoritsu 1 month, 2 weeks ago
    Three Labs. Two pets and a service dog (diabetic alert for my wife, a type 1 that doesn’t notice when her sugar is low).

    Oldest is up there, 15+. Still can catch a frisbee, but slowing down. He was 95 lbs of rippling muscle, and wanted to do what you want so bad he would shake if he couldn’t figure it out. He is a “fox red lab”, yellow by AKC. Great dog!

    Middle one is a Lab’s lab. He is smart, soft, sneaky, and would eat until he exploded. We do keep him fit though. No fat dogs here. Very light colored yellow.

    Youngest is about 5, black lab, very mild temperament. VERY good nose, but the others are pretty good too. He can tell blood sugar by breath from another room. It is amazing. He is about 90 lbs, American Lab shape. He needs a lot of exercise. He is very snuggly.

    All are friendly (I did say Lab, right?). The oldest is alpha, major. He is friendly to other dogs...if...they understand he is alpha.

    We’d have ten if we had space
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    • Posted by $ Dobrien 1 month, 2 weeks ago
      Had lots of dogs .The best was Callaway a black lab springer mix. She could curl up into a bowling ball or stretch out like a step ladder. She would piss off our zgolden Retriever get her to chase her and end up with the Golden’s tail in her mouth with a little side step and a shifting of her gears lol
      She would do the springer move when in fields of tall grass. I Miss that one a lot.
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