Its A Wonderful College Admissions Scandal

Posted by mshupe 6 months ago to Education
33 comments | Share | Flag

It is long overdue to expose the higher education racket. These sanctimonious scammers will hopefully get some well deserved comeuppance. Not holding my breath.
SOURCE URL: https://www.centerforindividualism.org/the-real-story-of-the-college-admissions-scandal/


Add Comment

FORMATTING HELP

All Comments Hide marked as read Mark all as read

  • Posted by Abaco 6 months ago
    Very good article. I have to admit - I have a couple kids who will be looking at attending college in the near future. I'm perplexed by the whole thing. I'm familiar with the things mentioned in that article about how financial "need" is calculated as I worked in finance for some time. I got a fantastic bachelors degree in engineering for a total (including gas, housing, food, etc..) of $35k. Now one can pay 1000% more (haha...funny figure). Discount that out to what you need to set aside each month starting when your kid is born and...well, there's the problem.

    Add to that the fact that the elite collectivists in this story did what they always do.

    Many years ago I worked with a lovely lady who grew up in communist Vietnam. She scored the highest in her village with their pre-college exam. She wanted to study medicine and, per the program, should have gotten to do that. However, her father had been an American sympathizer. So, she wasn't allowed to pursue her dream. At that time her father said something like "F this place" and snuck the family here. Now...where can we go?...
    Reply | Mark as read | Best of... | Permalink  
    • Posted by DrZarkov99 6 months ago
      Advise your kids that there are many good state schools with a more credible reputation than the scammers for the high priced institutions. It's been more than fifty years since I graduated from Texas A&M, but even then I was shocked to listen to a recruiter from a leading aerospace company tell me my degree was worth much more than any of the ivy league schools, because it was common knowledge that those schools sold degrees for the children of big alumni contributors.
      Reply | Mark as read | Parent | Best of... | Permalink  
      • Posted by Abaco 6 months ago
        Cal Poly for me. Fantastic education. Almost impossible to get accepted there anymore. I think grade inflation is a factor as just about everybody there now had a 4.2 gpa in high school, etc...
        Reply | Mark as read | Parent | Best of... | Permalink  
  • Posted by Lucky 6 months ago
    Good stuff!
    I've seen much of that in print and in practice but it is good to get a compilation.
    I liked the quotes using economic analysis, the field of economics has much to offer when used honestly.

    Now, those celebrities caught offering bribes, the same ones no doubt, who indulge in virtue signalling by telling the deplorables to cut carbon emissions.
    Reply | Mark as read | Best of... | Permalink  
    • Posted by 6 months ago
      Since there is no efficient pricing mechanism, a two year program may be the best place to start, or a for profit school. Maybe transfer to a four year program after their sophomore year, if the traditional four year degree is needed. Or go straight into the work force and acquire experience and get a free education online.
      Reply | Mark as read | Parent | Best of... | Permalink  
    • Posted by 6 months ago
      Last night Tucker Carlson had a great segment on this. Some of his content was identical to this article. And yes, the celebrities are hypocrites, but what else is new.
      Reply | Mark as read | Parent | Best of... | Permalink  
  • Posted by  $  puzzlelady 6 months ago
    The progressive crowd wants free education for everyone. Is that regardless of "merit", i.e. grades achieved in classes and on qualifying tests? If everyone is to get free education, how many students is there room for in any university if no one is to be turned away? Why today are admissions limited to only a certain number of students, chosen by scholastic merit or "social justice" criteria?

    Why can you go to eBay and buy what you want if you can outbid others? Why are such auctions almost a religion when people use it for getting stuff but declared a crime when applied to getting into schools? Universities are forever campaigning for endowments by their alumni or anyone else. How is that different from getting money from parents for enrolling their kids?

    Paying exorbitant amounts above inflated tuitions should not be called bribery; otherwise everything that is paid for anything in trade and commerce could be defined as a bribe.

    A small example: I am an artist and sell at art fairs. Occasionally a potential buyer will ask if "I can do better" on price if he buys more than one item. I explain that I don't bribe customers that way, and that no one gets a better deal.

    As for the College Admissions “Scandal”, it is just to feed the envy and hatred of the rich. Pretty ugly spectacle. If the progressives get their way of free education for everyone, that would save the rich a lot of money. Has anyone considered that?
    Reply | Mark as read | Best of... | Permalink  
    • Posted by evlwhtguy 6 months ago
      "Why are such auctions almost a religion when people use it for getting stuff but declared a crime when applied to getting into schools? "

      Because the two faced bastards fraudulently tell you that it is a competitive environment based on ability and it most certainly isn't.

      " If the progressives get their way of free education for everyone, that would save the rich a lot of money".

      No it won't....it will only fill up the schools with the dregs of society who want to extend their childhood. the rich will have to find other schools so their little darlings wont have to go with the Riffraff. BESIDES....who cares if someone else saves money. That is not a very objectivist viewpoint....to be against something solely because some rich guy will get ahead.
      Reply | Mark as read | Parent | Best of... | Permalink  
  • Posted by GaryL 6 months ago
    I find it rather interesting at my wife's place of employment. Most of the jobs require at least a 2 or 4 year college degree. What is most interesting in her office is the degrees her employees have are not in any way related to the type of work or business they are in. One guy above my wife does hold a 4 year degree in business finance yet at just 40 years old and single living with his mother he is so deep in debt they repossessed his Range Rover from the lot at work. No, he is not paying off student loans because mom and dad paid that freight. He is a jet setter with the fancy vacations, expensive cars and trophy GFs with very expensive tastes.
    Reply | Mark as read | Best of... | Permalink  
  • Posted by Mikelofton 6 months ago
    Hopefully this story detours in a healthy direction and sheds light on the decades of scandal that has sent millions of incompetent students to universities they're entirely ill-suited for, simply because they're of a certain minority status or economic strata, and for the sake of diversity (for diversity's sake alone!). Maybe it takes catching a few wealthy cheaters that everybody loves to hate to disinfect the criminal behavior that's infected higher education. Hmmm? Sounds like a certain president of the U.S., doesn't it. :)
    Reply | Mark as read | Best of... | Permalink  
  • Posted by preimert1 6 months ago
    When I attended Georgia Tech in early '50's tuition was $69 per quarter, books around $100. We all had to take classes in welding, machine shop, moulding,etc. (a legacy from its original genesis as North Avenue Trade Tech. We all had to build an electric motor from scratch) along with math and physics. Classes changed at the sound of a steam whistle.
    There was an option to enroll as a co-op student where one could work alternating years at cooperating companies to earn enough to attend school the following year. A lot of veterans attended on then GI Bill following WWII.

    Look where it is now. One of the top engineering schools in the world! I like to think we made it that way.
    Reply | Mark as read | Best of... | Permalink  
  • Posted by 6 months ago
    Does anyone know how much worse the rip-off has gotten since 2000?
    Reply | Mark as read | Best of... | Permalink  
    • Posted by freedomforall 6 months ago
      I can tell you how it compares to 1975 from personal experience and 2000 according to online documents.
      In '75 a resident student at a well respected state engineering university had a matriculation bill of about $144 per quarter and it took 12 quarters to get a bachelors degree in engineering. Total matriculation for a bachelors degree was roughly $1,728. A non-resident student paid an additional tuition cost of about $3,000 (because the resident student's parents had paid taxes in the state for years that were used to support the university.)
      The dormitory costs in '75 were about $35 per month per student in a 2-person room located downtown in a major metropolitan city. Meals were about $200 per quarter. (Annual room and board total was about $915.) Books cost about $60 per quarter ($180/year.) Other mandatory fees (student activity,student health, etc) were about $200/year.
      The resident matriculation increased over the next 2 decades (1995) to $7,596 (for 4 year degree), while the non-resident tuition increased to about $18,360 (for a 4-year degree.)
      By the year 2000, resident matriculation was up to about $11,584 and non-resident tuition was up to about $34,752 additional for a 4 year degree.
      In 2000, the annual room and board is estimated at $5,090 and books at about $500/year. Other mandatory fees were $694/year.
      For 2018, resident matriculation is $49,672 and non-resident tuition is an extra $82,384 for a 4-year degree. (This includes other mandatory fees of $2,410/year)
      Room and board in 2018 is $11,492/year.
      Books are estimated at $800/year for 2018.

      This is for a state public university, not one of the elite institutions that have additional costs for the relationship "pull" received by rubbing elbows with sons and daughters of thieving looters.

      Recap
      1975 resident 4-year degree tuition, books, room and board $6,908
      1975 non-resident 4-year degree tuition, books, room and board $6,908+12,000 = $18,908
      2000 resident 4-year degree tuition, books, room and board $36,720
      2000 non-resident 4-year degree tuition, books, room and board $36,720+$34,752=$71,472
      2018 resident 4-year degree tuition, books, room and board $98,840
      2018 non-resident 4-year degree tuition, books, room and board $98,840 + $82,384 = $181,224
      This university claims to be rated as the 4th best "value" in the US in 2018 according to an independent study.
      Reply | Mark as read | Parent | Best of... | Permalink  
      • Posted by TheOldMan 6 months ago
        BTW how much do illegal immigrants pay? IIRC, here in CA, they get in-state tuition rates and in some cases, essentially free (first person in family to go to college, etc....).
        Reply | Mark as read | Parent | Best of... | Permalink  
      • Posted by  $  blarman 6 months ago
        Outstanding recap!

        I read an article more than a decade ago in a popular magazine that talked all about the rising costs of higher education and how it wasn't linked to anything but their own skyrocketing prices - except maybe government assistance.

        If people started realizing the value of trades - for which a college degree is pretty useless - and the prevalence of good jobs in this sector I think we could get people out of this mentality that a college degree is necessary. I think the thing which pains me the most is that the vast majority of an undergraduate education is what you should have learned in high school - basic "Readin', 'Ritin', and 'Rithmetic".
        Reply | Mark as read | Parent | Best of... | Permalink  
        • Posted by freedomforall 6 months ago
          I agree. My own experience was that I could have skipped the first 2 years of college, with the exception of one quarter of calculus that covered more than I had learned in high school. It was a waste of time that could have been used to learn more about my field of study. After the 2nd year I switched to a bachelor of business and took a day job in that area.
          Reply | Mark as read | Parent | Best of... | Permalink  

FORMATTING HELP

  • Comment hidden. Undo