What ONE Song Best Describes Your Life Now?

Posted by EgoPriest 2 months, 2 weeks ago to Entertainment
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If you've clicked on the link then you know mind (only I'd replace the fiction of "God" with the reality of "Galt").

A happy fun-fact: the Ad that preceded my song was a preview of Creed II: "If you didn't follow your dreams, then you wouldn't exist" it begins! No truer words were ever said (except the similar words expressing the same principle as first stated by Ayn Rand, and in earlier ways).
SOURCE URL: https://youtu.be/U3j9GaIdiho


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  • Posted by  $  AJAshinoff 2 months, 2 weeks ago
    Lately
    Virtue and Vice.. Holy Soldier, Christian Rock Band.
    https://youtu.be/MNvxyvpFnqM
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    • Posted by 2 months, 1 week ago
      Thank you for sharing that. I can totally relate to that this-world-and-that, mind-body struggle heroically waged toward a just resolution that seems to lie always just beyond the dim horizon: thus the need for momentum, to drive the cart ahead of the horse if possible, only it isn't.

      Life is motion, and this rock track has motion in spades, but the plaint is never resolved, we remain in purgatory, implying no resolution possible on earth (but there's always the peace of the grave to look forward to).

      [If you're offended by my musings on what may for you be sacred ground, I will tactfully leave you to your own take-away, but most heavy or prog-rock expresses to my mind a worldly-supernaturalism, endless time but limited space pushing one ever-forward.]

      The above I draw abstractly from the logic but static uniformity of the progressive motion. Life IS motion, and progress IS perfection, but only if one's sense of "perfection" is real (i.e., is attainable on earth and in one's lifetime).

      And I can readily appreciate the derivative sense of free will that religion instills, as having been brought up very religiously myself. I always had to have a Platonic/Heroic archetype and really assign John Galt this role.

      My advice, if you are open to it, would be to wrap your eyeballs as quickly as you are able around a book called "Understanding Objectivism," listening to the course on tape back in the "90s pulled me out of that meta-ethical battlefield and malaise forever.

      And I very much enjoyed listening to that and following the Jeckyll and Hyde tortured-idealism ready to endure the storm forever and ever like a Hank Rearden too proud to betray his solemn duty to the very end (and "beyond"). Only there is no "beyond."
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  • Posted by tohar1 2 months, 1 week ago
    Recently this song (Self Inflicted Wounds by Joe Bonamassa) has been making a lot of sense to me...https://youtu.be/SU0JEvoM1k0
    Not only a great song, but a wonderful new blues album (just released about a week ago).
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    • Posted by 2 months, 1 week ago
      I agree, excellent lyric reminiscent of Galt's case against the mystics of spirit, teachers and worshippers of self-inflicted wounds.

      I also recognize the excellent bassist from Brian Wilson's "Smile."
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  • Posted by JamieJohnson 2 months, 1 week ago
    "In My Life", The Beatles
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    • Posted by 2 months, 1 week ago
      I love that song! George Martin's baroque harpsichord interlude was genius, perfectly integrated with the rest. I can't say enough good things about this perfect gem (partly because I'm running out the door).

      But here's another George Martin produced song (Abbey Road in the "80s) that expresses my feeling for our romantic-revolution for pure laissez-faire capitalism and maximal individual liberty: come fly the just & friendly skies with me:

      https://youtu.be/nf8PNsOn6w8

      Egopriest! B)
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  • Posted by 2 months ago
    Watching The Wheels
    John Lennon

    People say I'm crazy
    Doing what I'm doing
    Well, they give me all kinds of warnings
    To save me from ruin
    When I say that I'm okay, well they look at me kinda strange
    "Surely, you're not happy now, you no longer play the game"

    People say I'm lazy
    Dreaming my life away
    Well they give me all kinds of advice
    Designed to enlighten me
    When I tell them that I'm doing fine watching shadows on the wall
    "Don't you miss the big time boy, you're no longer on the ball?"

    I'm just sitting here watching the wheels go round and round
    I really love to watch them roll
    No longer riding on the merry-go-round
    I just had to let it go

    Ah, people ask me questions
    Lost in confusion
    Well, I tell them there's no problem
    Only solutions
    Well, they shake their heads and they look at me, as if I've lost my mind
    I tell them there's no hurry, I'm just sitting here doing time

    I'm just sitting here watching the wheels go round and round
    I really love to watch them roll
    No longer riding on the merry-go-round

    I just had to let it go
    I just had to let it go
    I just had to let it go

    [ https://youtu.be/39Em6t0G7Fc ]
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  • Posted by Herb7734 2 months, 1 week ago
    Beyond the Blue Horizon is the most life-affirming song I have ever heard. The Lou Christie version is so good, I could listen to it over and over and never get tired of it. If I'm down, it always picks me up. Jeanette MacDonald introduced the song and she also does a fine job. Here's a bit of the first words:
    Beyond the blue horizon
    lies a wonderful day
    Goodbye to things that bore me
    Life is waiting for me.
    It was partly written by Richard Whiting, father of a great pop singer, Margaret Whiting.
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  • Posted by 2 months, 1 week ago
    I must have sang this one to my now 2.5 y/o niece Zoe a hundred times -- and watched the Youtube video a few dozen more: https://youtu.be/lAOSZjzL80I

    I myself prefer the Bobby Short (at the Cafe Carlyle) version of this song from "Bobby Short Loves Cole Porter," the lyrics of which are (from memory).

    Rap Tap on Wood:

    "If you wanna ring that bell not once, but twice,
    If you wanna roll and roll those lucky dice,
    If you wanna share your journey's end with sweet music and love,
    If you wanna lick this world of men and micky-mice
    Take my advice:

    "When you wake up one day, look over yourself and say, "You're very good,"
    Rap tap on wood.

    "When with each fresh success you're conscious that you impress the neighborhood,
    Rap tap on wood.

    "When every meal you take is made of milk and honey,
    When every stock you stake is making mints of money,
    When every heart you break is such a cinch it's funny...careful sonny,
    Rap tap, rap tap, rap tap tap tap tap tap tap.

    "You'll knock out your good news
    and you'll never, never lose
    if you just put on your dancing shoes
    and rap tap on wood!"

    And from one of my poems:

    "To solve the riddles beguiling the world,
    dance today to the rhythms of logic:
    no method besides will conjure the clues."

    B^)
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  • Posted by LibertyBelle 2 months, 1 week ago
    I don't know. My absolute favorite song is La Marseillaise, but I don't seem to be succeeding as the tune would push me to. (To me, it's the tune that matters, though the words have a little significance).(Of course, there are plenty of great things in Gilbert& Sullivan, particularly HMS Pinafore, but that's different from saying that any of them describes my life as it is going right now).
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    • Posted by 2 months, 1 week ago
      Yes, in my mind are always the three-fold division of your mind and your convictions, the world in which you live and the life you live in it.

      So there are, according to Leonard Peikoff's DIM Hypothesis, three modes of integration that may apply to your three areas differently (for instance, I work to stay Integrated [I], but I live in a Disintegrating world [D}, and my life is compartmentalized as a result [d]. So my "DIM Key-Code" is [idD], not too pretty. :^/

      To counter that, I (and most people probably) pull more toward rationalism or stoicism [m], but that only gives credence to the full-blown mystics [M], the zero, rather than the hero, in my soul.
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  • Posted by jimjamesjames 2 months, 1 week ago
    I married T-R-O-U-B-L-E by Travis Tritt 35 years ago. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I5Mwi...
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    • Posted by freedomforall 2 months, 1 week ago
      I always enjoyed the lyrics of A Fine Romance. ;^)
      A fine romance, with no kisses
      A fine romance, my friend this is
      We should be like a couple of hot tomatoes
      But you're as cold as yesterday's mashed potatoes
      A fine romance, you won't nestle
      A fine romance, you won't wrestle
      I might as well play bridge
      With my old maid aunt
      I haven't got a chance
      This is a fine romance

      A fine romance, my good fellow
      You take romance, I'll take jello
      You're calmer than the seals
      In the Arctic Ocean
      At least they flap their fins
      To express emotion
      A fine romance with no quarrels
      With no insults and all morals
      I've never mussed the crease
      In your blue serge pants
      I never get the chance
      This is a fine romance

      A fine romance, with no kisses
      A fine romance, my friend this is
      We two should be like clams in a dish of chowder
      But we just fizz like parts of a Seidlitz powder
      A fine romance, with no clinches
      A fine romance, with no pinches
      You're just as hard to land as the Ile de France!
      I haven't got a chance, this is a fine romance.
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  • Posted by  $  exceller 2 months, 2 weeks ago
    Rachmaninoff: "Piano Concerto No.2
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    • Posted by 2 months, 2 weeks ago
      That doesn't answer the question. I have literally thousands of classical cds, but those works are not (hierarchically) comparable with the popular genres that are rooted in pre-philosophical culture (see The Golden Bough).

      Classical music began where philosophy began: with the Ancient Greek Parmenides' school and others. In that sense, popular music describes, it does not create but is necessary to that subsequent hierarchical development.

      That said, Rachmaninoff was the soundtrack of my life before and during my naval training in Great Lakes (having the slow movement from his Second Symphony No. 2 on replay in my brain for two months saw me through what might have been otherwise unendurable).

      When I read Atlas Shrugged for the first time in early '94, I had Philip Glass' "Glassworks" on repeat. But had I been asked specifically about the song that described, not the state of my mind, but of my day-to-day life, I would likely have picked UMF by Duran Duran or Not my Slave by Oingo Boing (rather than Danny Elfman), or maybe Your Own Personal Jesus by Depeche Mode (replacing Je-sus with John Galt).

      Now, today, what is the song with lyrics that best sums up your life, your social sphere. Only popular song has the empirical concreteness (not necessarily concrete-boundedness) for that.

      Actual music (i.e., classical, or other abstract ad libitum forms) is too personal, too metaphysical to be discursive. I also think, due to the spiral, abstract music sets the standard for all more "primal" forms, global, urban, or suburban.

      Also, although I do not doubt your sincerity or honest appreciation of that great masterpiece, apart from additional context giving it particular meaning and connection to your "moment" of some 2 or three hours ago, it strikes this interlocutor as a cliche' or virtue-signaling.

      So please correct me if my speculation based on absent information is unjust or off-the-mark please. As you can see, I take music very seriously (I'm too old for "whimsy").

      (:-D).

      And yes, such questions and discussions take honesty and courage with an art-form as personal as music and song. In order that something be "music of the world" as distinguished from your life, it has to be music you don't like, however ubiquitous.

      If you only like abstract music, I would be happy with art-song (e.g., Philip Glass's "Liquid Days," which I love though it expresses a quasi-worldly/quasi-mystical longing for a world of A and non-A).

      Benevolently,

      Ego-P Jae, of the
      John Galt Brigade [GSS-106]
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      • Posted by  $  exceller 2 months, 1 week ago
        Sorry if you find my answer lacking, according to your "standard".

        The piece still represents my life.
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        • Posted by 2 months, 1 week ago
          My objection was purely formal, and should have been a lot shorter and concise. Mostly I'm just fishing for more than you are apparently willing to divulge (e.g., the why).

          I mean, I think the world of Rachmaninoff and would have a lot to say about his this, or a particular recording to recommend (I own several on CD).

          So I wasn't trying to shame you or downplay music you love. I just wanted most of all to draw some pet distinctions I've worked hard to identity over the years between "formal" and "informal" music.

          In today's conceptual chaos it is even harder to talk about something as abstract and personal as music, or to defend any "'standards'" at all (scare quotes noted).
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