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Learning How Not To Be A Snowflake

Posted by  $  allosaur 7 months, 1 week ago to Philosophy
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Anyone here ever care for a safe space to shelter their tender feelings? Such as when Trump won? This article will help explain why so many lib young people displayed conniption fits and even tears.
From the article~
Resilience, a crucial emotional attribute for a happy and successful life, is in decline across college campuses and workplaces.
The head of counseling at one major university recently observed "a decrease in the ability of many young people to manage the everyday bumps in the road of life." In a memo, which was shared by Psychology Today, he wrote, "The lack of resilience is . . . thwarting the emotional and personal development of students." :

Hm, having copied the above and previously read the article, me dino suddenly wonders if this silly safe space nonsense demanded by students at some colleges is derived from living in a bubble at home. Or maybe in a bigger bubble like in all of San Francisco.
Me dino selected Philosophy as the category if for folks having an, ah~insufficiency in that department?
SOURCE URL: http://www.intellectualtakeout.org/article/learning-how-not-be-snowflake


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  • Posted by DrZarkov99 7 months, 1 week ago
    Teaching children that no matter how well or badly they perform that they're "special," and that everyone deserves to win destroys their sense of appreciation for accomplishment. When reality smacks them in the face with failure, they're not prepared to decide what to do next. The instinct of a prey animal is to hide, and we've turned a generation into prey animals that don't even have a "fight or flight" response when faced with a challenge.

    This creation of herds of prey animals was no accident. Authoritarian socialism works best when the populace is docile and easily led, and those wanting to become a powerful elite want no part of a people who are independent and capable.
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    • Posted by mccannon01 7 months, 1 week ago
      Marvelous analogy, Dr.

      It made me think of a mental version of the Eloi in H. G. Wells' "Time Machine". They will be devoured at the appropriate time. Hmmm, maybe the siren that calls them in will resemble a type of minaret. Just thinkin' out loud.
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  • Posted by  $  Ben_C 7 months, 1 week ago
    Affluence is a double edged sword. Had this discussion with one of my friends who owns a management company. He has real problems finding people who want to work. He feels the entitlement attitude is pervasive in young adults that come from affluent families and these kids have never really had a real job. We live in a very liberal town with few blue collar workers. I blame the parents for not kicking their kids in the ass and telling them to pay for their own gas and food. A helping hand - sure, but not total subsidy.
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  • Posted by maxgeoac 7 months, 1 week ago
    What do you expect from a generation that had their parents hovering over them 24/7? They couldn't go out and play on their own, without their parents or guardians being there, even at another parent's house (If they ever went out at all). They couldn't go into the kitchen without a parent asking what they needed. Although the one thing they also needed help with and never got was with homework (Unless the parents basically did it for them). When your parents make all your decisions, how is one supposed to learn to deal with and make decisions on their own?
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  • Posted by GaryL 7 months, 1 week ago
    Back in the 50s and 60s growing up if me and my brothers got out of line Dad was right there every evening to knock us back in line with a good old fashion ass wooping. OH-Wait, I think they made that illegal and call it child abuse these days.
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    • Posted by  $  Solver 7 months, 1 week ago
      I had a real problem with hitting my kids but that doesn’t mean that I didn’t punish them when needed by taking away their toys or locking them in their “safe” room.
      Most of the time though, it was just a hard love talk.
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      • Posted by  $  BeenThere 7 months, 1 week ago
        I offered mine the choice of spanking or lecture.....
        ...........all four always chose spanking. (As they matured,
        they chose lecture, as in "whys and wherefores".)
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        • Posted by  $  Dobrien 7 months, 1 week ago
          My daughter saw her older brother get spanked a couple of times for throwing a fit and I never had to discipline her (we were very lucky) .We also spent most of our free time with our kids.
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        • Posted by  $  7 months, 1 week ago
          That's interesting.
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          • Posted by  $  BeenThere 7 months, 1 week ago
            Maybe their butt told their brain to move up to their skull. :-)
            The "lectures" became discussions as they matured and has continued
            ("Dad, I need to discuss something with you.") over 50 years (they are now
            in their 50s&60s). All four have done well with their lives with reason as their base.
            (They each read AS to better understand those "whys and wherefores".)
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            • Posted by  $  7 months, 1 week ago
              My stepson gave me the hardest time and I'd spank him along with my sired kids only with the hand up to around five slaps on the butt..
              My dad would hit me with a belt and one time when I was about age 7 he kept hitting me until I admitted to something I did not do. I don't even remember what I was accused of. I just wanted him to stop hitting me with that belt.
              Anyway, I wouldn't use a belt on my kids. I just gave them a few slaps on the butt and that was rare.
              Long story shot, me stepson asked me to be the best man at his wedding, saying I had taught him a lot. (This was after I was divorced and my ex had divorced yet another father figure).
              Me dino was stunned. At least when he was nervously pacing before his wedding, I was right there with him to tell him I had gone through the same ordeal.
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    • Posted by LibertyBelle 7 months, 1 week ago
      I have never had children. I did however, take care of my younger sisters sometimes (I am 13 years older than one and 15 years older than the other). I did use a little corporal punishment at times. My main problem in regard to my parents' use of corporal punishment was not that they spanked or slapped me sometimes (Mama spanked, Daddy slapped), but that they wouldn't
      spank/slap my brother to my satisfaction. If I had children, I believe I would use corporal punishment when necessary, and I don't think the law, as a practical matter, could do much about it.
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  • Posted by jimjamesjames 7 months, 1 week ago
    "Maturity"

    "The ability to recognize what has to be done and the willingness to do it without being told."
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    • Posted by LibertyBelle 7 months, 1 week ago
      You try that on some jobs and it will get you in trouble. I know. I was in the workforce a long time, and I have seen many things.
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      • Posted by  $  Solver 7 months, 1 week ago
        It is a balance that needs to be learned, and experience is a great teacher. Those that balance independence with team work in the cultural context will typically earn higher positions.
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        • Posted by  $  7 months, 1 week ago
          Clint Eastwood's Harry Callahan in the Magnum Force movie gave me advice that helped me survive 21 years and earn a pension from the Alabama Department of Corrections.
          During the 80s a supervisor at a shift briefing described Corrections as "a cutthroat business" and everyone in the room knew he wasn't just talking about dealing with inmates.
          So what inspiring for me dino movie line did Clint Eastwood say during the 70s before I joined the DOJ during 1982?
          "Every man has got to know his limitations."
          Also~
          "When in doubt, look out" is a helpful something me dino made up all by myself one fine day at that prison.
          "Sgt. Esco has put a bullseye target on your back" was another. A happy day was when he transferred to another prison after me dino putting up with him for three years.
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    • Posted by  $  blarman 7 months, 1 week ago
      I work with a lot of pre-teens and the one thing I would add to that is "the ability to understand what is and is not acceptable in society and adhere to those norms." Trying to get them off their phones and interacting with other human beings is sometimes a huge challenge.
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  • Posted by  $  Solver 7 months, 1 week ago
    The HR department of any business that wants to be successful should weed out snowflakes and cultural maxists during the interview phase. Expect yelling, and to be called a racist, sexist, homophobic, Islamaphobic, bigot that supports the rape culture of the privileged straight Christian white male patriarchy, when you say, “no!”

    Use the snowflake test,
    https://youtu.be/L-7tu40PNAY
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  • Posted by  $  exceller 7 months, 1 week ago
    I think being a snowflake originates in the home these students are coming from. Most of them grow up without directions to follow in life. They grow up as weed, with no guidelines from their parents who are too busy with their own lives and let the kids manage on their own. The result is they attach themselves to other kids or an older person who seem to be representing their own concerns but have no idea about the right path.
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  • Posted by bkeiber 7 months, 1 week ago
    WWIII is coming ("Winter is coming" to quote Ned Stark).....that will take care of snowflakes and their thought processes....."neither" will survive.......the bubbles will be obliterated
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  • Posted by LibertyBelle 7 months, 1 week ago
    I have really learned to work a computer machine only with reluctance; I see a great many difficulties when trying to apply online for a job; I hate reading those Terms of Service, but cannot in good conscience just skip them, thereby agreeing to something I don't understand. So I suppose I am not as "resilient"
    as I ought to be.
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  • Posted by CircuitGuy 7 months, 1 week ago
    I think this article understates the problem. It describes character flaws that I suspect have always been with humankind, e.g. fear of failure, and tacitly invites readers to pat themselves on the back for not having these flaws. But I sense something new is happening. I think the pendulum is swinging the other way (hopefully) with this new emphasis on "grit".
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