The first ever photograph of light as both a particle and wave

Posted by Zenphamy 6 years ago to Science
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I'm still trying to wrap my head around this but it's 'velllly, vellllly, interesting.' In fact it's fascinating.
SOURCE URL: http://phys.org/news/2015-03-particle.html?utm_source=nwletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=splt-item&utm_campaign=daily-nwletter


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  • Posted by Zero 6 years ago
    What does this imply to Schrodinger's Cat?

    If both the wave and particle nature are observed simulateously, doesn't that throw an wrench into the whole "alive-and-dead-until observed" idea.

    I never did like that part nor understand why it had to follow.

    Is this counter-evidence to that claim?
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    • Posted by 6 years ago
      It does have an impact on some arguments that the Q state of measuring or observing method/devices necessarily have to be taken into consideration of the observed status and demonstrates the simultaneous nature of quantum phenomena. I think it also demonstrates that our understanding of and attempts to define quantum objects within the models we've developed to date are insufficient and we need to do more work on understanding. That although we can demonstrate particle nature at the quantum level and then can demonstrate wave nature and can even have an effect using those models, we still have to reconsider our descriptive and definitional theories at such levels of reality.
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    • Posted by CircuitGuy 6 years ago
      "What does this imply to Schrodinger's Cat? "
      I haven't studied this since my first years of college, but my understanding is the uncertainty principle, which is behind Schrodinger's Cat, says the precise position and velocity of a particle cannot be defined. Observing light exhibiting wave and particle properties simultaneously doesn't undo that.

      I'm hoping someone who knows more about physics can give a better answer.
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      • Posted by Zero 6 years ago
        I think you're right CG. I'm mashing up with the double-slit demonstration. Observing the wave solidifies it into the particle.

        My question still hangs though. What does this imply for double slit experiment? It sure seems to be violating some principle.
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  • Posted by CircuitGuy 6 years ago
    The photograph makes it harder for people to mysticize paradoxes of quantum mechanics.

    It sounds like they're saying the light source is monochromatic, and when the electrons give some of their energy to the photons, the monochromatic photons are blue-shifted.

    Since fast-moving electrons have a de Broglie wavelength, I wonder if there's any way you could model this as simple wave-wave interaction.
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