GAB: 'This explains why Tesla cars were burning up in Fl…'

Posted by $ AJAshinoff 10 months, 2 weeks ago to Education
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Anyone remember the Ford Pinto and it's exploding gas tank when impacted. Yet, this is perfectly fine?
SOURCE URL: https://gab.com/vaccinechoicecanada/posts/110414483986416546


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  • Posted by $ Thoritsu 10 months, 2 weeks ago
    Except it is completely wrong. Let's stop being wrong.

    This is a lithium primary cell. It is not rechargable, and does have a lithium electrode.

    Tesla and other EVs use Lithium Ion cells. They are rechargable, and DO NOT contain lithium in metallic form. The reason lithium ion cells are flammable is the organic electrolyte, NOT the lithium.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium...
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    • Posted by $ 10 months, 2 weeks ago
      Thanks! I figured there could be a difference but didn't know how much of a difference. So the organic electrolyte, since these "spontaneous combustion" events have and do occur, what is the catalyst that sets it off? Poor containment? A break in containment?
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      • Posted by $ Thoritsu 10 months, 2 weeks ago
        Temperature from heat.

        Lithium Ion (and all) rechargable cells have an internal impedance (resistance). When current goes through this resistance, during discharge (operation) and charging, it generates heat, and increases temperature. The smaller the cells the bigger the challenge in removing the heat.

        EV battery packs are energy dense, more and more as the attempt to reach operation (never chemical) parity with combustion fuel. Since they are getting smaller and smaller, the same heat increases the temperature faster (less thermal mass). Almost all the EV packs I am familiar with are actively cooled. Air or other coolant is circulated within them.

        We make an Energy Magazine for the US Navy. It is a large, rechargable battery pack to decouple directed energy weapons from the ship's distribution system. The requirement are that cell failures do NOT cascade to adjacent cell trays. Testing is severe. Of course this battery uses commercial batteries (18650 et al) like EVs, however, the physical protections limit the energy density somewhat. They should be safe unless hit directly with an actual weapon (Navy round or missile. Small arms are one of the tests we much conduct.
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    • Posted by mhubb 10 months, 2 weeks ago
      ever take a charged lithium battery and puncture it??

      if not, try it, from a safe distance

      a VERY safe distance
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      • Posted by $ Thoritsu 10 months, 2 weeks ago
        This is one of the tests we have to perform on our system for the Navy. It can be spectacular. What happens is shorting of the anode and cathode which heats like a shorted filament, and then ignites the electrolyte.

        Success in the Navy test is to contain the consequences not to cascade to other cells and bypass the damaged subset of cells.
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  • Posted by Running4mylife 10 months, 2 weeks ago
    I will drive my beautiful gas juice burning beauty until she runs no more. Gas prices may keep going up and I will find a way to pay for it because there is no way in hell I am going to endanger my life and those I love by climbing aboard a match waiting to ignite.
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  • Posted by WilliamRThomas 10 months, 2 weeks ago
    Please consult general statistics.

    If a Tesla burns: OH THAT IS NEWS. (due to being quite rare even on a per-model basis)

    If a gas car burns, eh, that isn't news. Yet it happens all the time.
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    • Posted by mhubb 10 months, 2 weeks ago
      you can put out a gas car fire

      try putting out a lithium fire
      if you dare

      and the battery is often damaged and can burn long after the damage it receives, unexpected
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  • Posted by rjkford 10 months, 2 weeks ago
    I’ve sold Fords since 1973. The Pinto thing was tragic but overblown (no pun intended ) . What was not publicized was the fact that they had just filled the gas tank and forgot to put the cap back on, they pulled over because of that. The idiot who hit them was searching the floor for a joint he dropped and wasn’t looking up. Perfect recipe for disaster. For the time, the Pinto wasn’t a bad car.
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  • Posted by Eyecu2 10 months, 2 weeks ago
    I use this video in my class to explain alkaline metals.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m55kg...
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    • Posted by $ Thoritsu 10 months, 2 weeks ago
      Too bad you probably can just do the experiment anymore. Can you?

      When I was in HS, we put lithium in water to show the reaction. That was the early 80's and the heat was already on from stupid Karens and administrators.

      I was a Chemistry aide, and the Vice Principal came into the lab and told us we needed to separate two gas cylinders, so we wouldn't have an explosion: Oxygen and Helium. I told him if we did have a reaction we'd be the first high school to get the Nobel Prize.
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      • Posted by $ blarman 10 months, 2 weeks ago
        Oxygen and helium (an inert gas), eh. Hehe. Just goes to show how useful Vice Principals are and continue to be. Maybe he/she was afraid of students imitating Alvin and the Chipmunks.

        I just attended a HS graduation for one of my daughters on Saturday. It was interesting to see who the student body actually clapped for. Not a single member of the Board of Trustees got anything more than a golf clap. Several of the teachers received warm, congratulatory hugs from grads.
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      • Posted by Eyecu2 10 months, 2 weeks ago
        As I am a math teacher, I haven't had occasion to try any of those experiments in the classroom.
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        • Posted by $ Thoritsu 10 months, 2 weeks ago
          Why are you talking about alkaline metals in the classroom then? Just curious.
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          • Posted by Eyecu2 10 months, 2 weeks ago
            Once the relevant material has been covered I often cover unrelated material that both the students and myself find interesting.
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            • Posted by $ Thoritsu 10 months, 2 weeks ago
              That’s cool. My father was a HS Physics teacher. I love teaching too. Back in the day, I took his class a couple of times when I was in college. Substitute teachers knew nothing (particularly Physics), and there weren’t all the rules of today. Students seemed to like it.

              In college we had a professor who combined literature and history. Connecting the literature of the day with architecture and even furniture was interesting and made me remember thing rote approaches never would. I look a math and science that way.
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              • Posted by Eyecu2 10 months, 2 weeks ago
                I often go off on rabbit trails covering nearly any subject. I especially like opening their eyes to things from history not normally covered and how it relates to the present.
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  • Posted by $ Stormi 10 months, 2 weeks ago
    My brother was USAF Mafor stationed in Fla. He had a gorgeous Cadillac but was fighting the salt spry , so went to an lighter color car, to avoid the fading, and one less affected by the sea salt. Would not the sea saly spry get up into the engine from the roads, and would that not act on the lithium batteries? We know they are very susceptible many outside elements.Once they start to deteriorate, they are unstable.
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  • Posted by term2 10 months, 2 weeks ago
    As I understand it, the components of lithium ion batters and self ignite if hot enough and do not require oxygen to keep on burning. So what would we expect to happen in a car crash?
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  • Posted by GaryL 10 months, 2 weeks ago
    I have a bunch of those Li energizer batteries and now I have to go toss one in a bucket with water. Not sure if it will matter if the battery is dead and drained or not but I do have to try it.
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    • Posted by $ 10 months, 2 weeks ago
      My guess,
      I think if the lithium sheet were exposed to water it would react the same, charged or not. The reaction is natural between two elements and doubtfully has anything to do with the amount of charge.
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  • Posted by $ 25n56il4 10 months, 2 weeks ago
    If everything I've read about electric autos is real and the lithium batteries...they won't fly on the Gulf Coast of Texas...first hurricane and flood they'll all be gone.
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  • Posted by AmericanWoman 10 months, 2 weeks ago
    Yes sure do had my cousin's daughter and boyfriend rear ended in the Baltimore Harbor Tunnel through way into the tube by a 18 wheeler their caskets were head to head.
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