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R.I.P. Rush - Like Ayn, he was one of a kind ...

Posted by Joy1inchrist 4 months ago to The Gulch: General
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Rush Limbaugh gave a lengthy monologue titled “The Smallest Minority on Earth,” in which he talked about the importance of individual rights.

Along the way, he paid due homage to the “brilliant writer and novelist, Ayn Rand.” Here is a key excerpt:

As I said, we have a gigantic new audience to this program, the tune-in factor is just through the roof. For those of you who are new to the program, I want you to please understand that the criticism of the Obama administration here and the disagreement with practically every element of his agenda is based on one thing.

We do not want to lose the liberty and freedom that we were born with in this country and that has made this the greatest country on earth, that has given us the greatest, most prosperous lifestyle any of population of human beings in the history of the planet. It has been liberty; it’s been freedom; it has been the ambition and desire to use that freedom in the concept of self-interest.

I want to spend more time on this in a future program. But this notion of sacrifice that the president talked about yesterday is just over the top. Liberals always talk about sacrifice, Obama, every time he opens his mouth, mentions the need for people to sacrifice. We all must suffer. We all have to jointly suffer in order for all of us to somehow be the same, and self-interest, selfishness is condemned. And self-interest not selfishness. Self-interest is what built this country.

Somebody starting a business did it in his self-interest. He didn’t start a business so that there would be jobs and health care in the community. He started a business because he loved the business that he was in. He loved the business that he wanted to build. He had a product or a service that he thought would improve the lives of people. He wanted to sell it to them; he wanted to make it available to them. Everybody wins when everybody’s acting in self-interest. Selfishness is a different thing.

Self-interest is excellence; self-interest is what’s desired; self-interest is what makes people want raises; self-interest is what makes people want their families to be secure; self-interest is what makes parents want their kids to be properly educated; self-interest is what propels the United States military to victory. Not sacrifice. Not the concept of sacrifice.

Sacrifice is giving something to somebody you don’t know to make yourself feel altruistic. You’re not sacrificing. It doesn’t make you great. But giving something to your family because you provided it for them, that is good. But if you run around just giving people who do nothing for you, who are just worthless, don’t have anything to do with you, you’re cheating them out of their own self-interest.

When you vote for politicians who take from your back pocket to give to others, you think it’s compassionate, you think it’s caring? It’s not. It’s depriving the recipient of his own quest for self-interest.

The brilliant writer and novelist, Ayn Rand, has written about this. Let me give you a couple quotes from Ayn Rand on this. “It only stands to reason that where there’s sacrifice, there’s someone collecting the sacrificial offerings. Where there’s service, there is someone being served. The man who speaks to you of sacrifice is speaking of slaves and masters, and intends to be the master.” That is President Obama.

“Where there is sacrifice, there’s somebody collecting the sacrificial offerings.” What does it mean? President Obama says, “We all need to sacrifice,” for this reason or that reason. What it means is we all need to pay more; we need to have less affluent lives; we need to dial down our prosperity, and we need to give the money to him, not a charity. He’s going to eliminate, for all intents and purposes, the tax deductibility, it’s going to be 28 cents for every dollar, charitable donations. He wants to be the distributor of the charitable donations. He wants to be the distributor of the goods because he wants the glory.

“So it only stands to reason that where there’s sacrifice, there’s somebody collecting the sacrificial offerings.” Who is it that’s talking about sacrifice? President Obama. Who’s going to collect your sacrificial offerings? President Obama and his government. And “where there’s service, there’s somebody being served.” There’s no sacrifice in service. The president who speaks to you of sacrifice is speaking of slaves and masters. He intends to be the master. You’re the slave. You must sacrifice.
SOURCE URL: http://www.theatlasphere.com/metablog/800.php


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  • Posted by 4 months ago
    Like so many of us, Rush was greatly inspired by Ayn Rand. And in many ways, he too was a great spokesperson for freedom. He spoke out when his ideas were not popular and paved the way for so many conservative journalists. This is a sad day for America. Rest in peace, Rush
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  • Posted by 25n56il4 4 months ago
    I was so saddened by his death, his greatness gone from us, I cried. He was an original.
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    • Posted by 4 months ago
      Indeed, this has been the most (shall I say) challenging 12 month period of my life. And here I sit, in the midst of one of Texas' worst winter storms with no water and intermittent power. Yet, it was THIS that brought me to tears. Rush symbolized hope in our country. Such a great loss
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    • Posted by bobsprinkle 3 months, 4 weeks ago
      As was my habit every day at noon (east coast time) I was settling down with my noon meal. The radio was on. I was hoping Rush would be on. But I was prepared for one of the guest hosts. Literally, during the first bite of my meal, I heard a female voice that I did not recognize. I thought to myself that a female guest host would be a bit of a change. But, still good. But then I noticed the somber tone. And Katherine told me Rush was gone. The rest of the day was grim.
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  • Posted by Jkj7 4 months ago
    I have been a fan of Rand since high school 1970. I was exposed to Rush much later. I have fond memories of lying awake at some odd hour of the night listening to him for hours on Armed Forces Network in Belgium. My only displease was that they cut off the last hour :(
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  • Posted by $ Abaco 4 months ago
    I must confess...I often have thought about starting a podcast based on a similar format. We have very few of those out there who can do basic liberty justice it seems. Rogan is too shallow to flesh out the ideas, but has great guests. Stefan Molyneoux is one of my favorites but stepped on the third rail of race and that gutted him. I need to explore a little more but I don't have the time...
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  • Posted by $ Abaco 4 months ago
    I was thinking back on the moment I first heard Rush's voice. I was moving back to California from Washington and was driving south by Mount Shasta. My dad (RIP) said, "You have to hear this guy" so I tuned in at that moment and there he was. I always appreciated Rush even if I didn't agree with what he said all the time. He was so good at what he did.
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    • Posted by 4 months ago
      Great memory to have your dad introduce you to Rush. I can't remember my first "Rush memory", just the vague feeling of, "Yes!!!". He struck such a chord in me - I was already a follower of Rand and was excited to hear someone proudly and publicly proclaim freedom and liberty on the radio! How wonderful that he lived long enough to have received the "Presidential Medal of Freedom" just last February. Indeed, there will never be another Rush
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      • Posted by $ Abaco 4 months ago
        He got his start in talk radio right around here in the Sacramento market - KFBK. He quickly became famous once he started just voicing his opinions and went syndicated and moved to NY, then Florida.

        I watched him when he was on the golf instruction show where a famous golf pro down in Florida worked several episodes with him to try to improve his game. It was interesting to watch because you got to see him away from the microphone and just chatting while hitting balls...much like I do. It that setting I could really relate to him. He enjoyed rattling off Hilary Clinton jokes just like I used to do...before I learned to keep my mouth shut...haha...
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  • Posted by bobsprinkle 3 months, 4 weeks ago
    Does anyone have any idea what will ultimately be done with the 3hr time slot?
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    • Posted by mccannon01 3 months, 4 weeks ago
      THAT is a good question! I will miss Rush in the afternoons tremendously. I'd have him on while puttering in the workshop, doing yard work, or while doing any number of chores at the time.

      I'd like to see Mark Steyn step up as the main host for that time slot as his insights and sense of humor are always welcome, factual, and entertaining. It would be a good opportunity for him to swim on his own. I was always delighted to have Mark stand in for Rush.

      I believe it was Isaac Newton who attributed his success to those that preceded him in saying, "I stand on the shoulders of giants." - or something like that. Rush is a giant whose shoulders provided footing for those that come after him, but I think Steyn can be his own giant as well. Time will tell and we shall see.
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  • Posted by Lnxjenn 4 months ago
    I think it hit me more yesterday than it did the day he passed away... it's hitting me even harder today. I am on the verge of tears but haven't cried yet. But I feel a very profound sadness... I found it sort of ironic - I had brought up the podcast from his show the day before the morning of his death, listening to Mark Stein - and I hadn't listened in awhile... I was missing Rush. So i almost feel if I hadn't listened to the podcast, maybe he wouldn't be gone... sounds stupid. but just felt ironic to me that i hadn't listened in a few months, not for lacking of desire just timing and listening to others atm...and the first time in awhile i listened is the day he died.

    I am glad that he is no longer suffering. That brings me joy actually! Cancer is horrible, as I have had members of my family and hubby's family die from various ones.

    My dad kindly reminded me I was a Rush Baby! haha. I remembered listening to it in the car with my dad growing up. I was fairly religious about listening to him around 2007 through 2011 or so. even signed up to his Rush24/7 :) (I even had a tshirt!) So he has definitely impacted my life for a very long time. I don't think i'd be quite the person I am today without his influence (and my dad's) And even Ayn Rand's!
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