National economic, security and reformation act

Posted by $ Olduglycarl 1 month, 2 weeks ago to News
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ALSO, And We Know/: Starts about the 32 min mark.
https://www.bitchute.com/video/sdbANK...

Source link below: Document
SOURCE URL: https://www.intothelight.news/knowledge-base/nesara/


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  • Posted by 25n56il4 1 month, 2 weeks ago
    Four American Presidents tried to eliminate the Federal Reserve and they were all shot. Reagan however lived.
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    • Posted by $ 1 month, 2 weeks ago
      So you've heard of this?

      I just read the history...seems plausible...we know of Georgie poo Sr 1000 points of lights new world order.
      The tie in to 911 caught me off guard.

      Seems we can't ever trust even the non- supreme courts...
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      • Posted by 25n56il4 1 month, 2 weeks ago
        As I recall it was Lincoln, Harding, Kennedy and Reagan that tried to do away with the Fed Res.
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        • Posted by mccannon01 1 month, 2 weeks ago
          OK, I haven't read the whole thing yet, but am I missing something? The Federal Reserve Act forming the Federal Reserve was in 1913, which leaves Lincoln off the list. Also Harding died of an apparent heart attack or food poisoning or stroke or Al Capone or some other mystery, but not shot.
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          • Posted by $ Dobrien 1 month, 2 weeks ago
            Some Founding Fathers were strongly opposed to the formation of a central banking system; the fact that England tried to place the colonies under the monetary control of the Bank of England was seen by many as the "last straw"[verification needed] of oppression which led directly to the American Revolutionary War.[citation needed]

            Others were strongly in favor of a central bank. Robert Morris, as Superintendent of Finance, helped to open the Bank of North America in 1782, and has been accordingly called by Thomas Goddard "the father of the system of credit and paper circulation in the United States." As ratification in early 1781 of the Articles of Confederation had extended to Congress the sovereign power to generate bills of credit, it passed later that year an ordinance to incorporate a privately subscribed national bank following in the footsteps of the Bank of England. However, it was thwarted in fulfilling its intended role as a nationwide central bank due to objections of "alarming foreign influence and fictitious credit", favoritism to foreigners and unfair policies against less corrupt state banks issuing their own notes, such that Pennsylvania's legislature repealed its charter to operate within the Commonwealth in 1785.

            In 1791, former Morris aide and chief advocate for Northern mercantile interests, Alexander Hamilton, the Secretary of the Treasury, accepted a compromise with the Southern lawmakers to ensure the continuation of Morris's Bank project; in exchange for support by the South for a national bank, Hamilton agreed to ensure sufficient support to have the national or federal capitol moved from its temporary Northern location, New York, to a "Southern" location on the Potomac. As a result, the First Bank of the United States (1791–1811) was chartered by Congress within the year and signed by George Washington soon after. The First Bank of the United States was modeled after the Bank of England and differed in many ways from today's central banks. For example, it was partly owned by foreigners, who shared in its profits. Also, it was not solely responsible for the country's supply of bank notes. It was responsible for only 20% of the currency supply; state banks accounted for the rest. Several founding fathers bitterly opposed the Bank. Thomas Jefferson saw it as an engine for speculation, financial manipulation, and corruption.[1] In 1811 its twenty-year charter expired and was not renewed by Congress.

            After five years, the federal government chartered its successor, the Second Bank of the United States (1816–1836). James Madison signed the charter with the intention of stopping runaway inflation that had plagued the country during the five-year interim. It was basically a copy of the First Bank, with branches across the country. Andrew Jackson, who became president in 1828, denounced the bank as an engine of corruption. His destruction of the bank was a major political issue in the 1830s and shaped the Second Party System, as Democrats in the states opposed banks and Whigs supported them. He was unable to get the bank dissolved, but refused to renew its charter. Jackson attempted to counteract this by executive order requiring all federal land payments to be made in gold or silver. This produced the Panic of 1837.
            1837–1862: "Free Banking" Era Edit

            Main article: Wildcat banking
            Period % Change in Money Supply % Change in Price Level
            1832–37 + 61 +28
            1837–43 βˆ’ 58 βˆ’35
            1843–48 +102 + 9
            1848–49 βˆ’ 11 0
            1849–54 +109 +32
            1854–55 βˆ’ 12 + 2
            1855–57 + 18 + 1
            1857–58 βˆ’ 23 βˆ’16
            1858–61 + 35 βˆ’ 4
            In this period, only state-chartered banks existed. They could issue bank notes against specie (gold and silver coins) and the states heavily regulated their own reserve requirements, interest rates for loans and deposits, the necessary capital ratio etc. These banks had existed since 1781, in parallel with the Banks of the United States. The Michigan Act (1837) allowed the automatic chartering of banks that would fulfill its requirements without special consent of the state legislature. This legislation made creating unstable banks easier by lowering state supervision in states that adopted it. The real value of a bank bill was often lower than its face value, and the issuing bank's financial strength generally determined the size of the discount. By 1797 there were 24 chartered banks in the U.S.; with the beginning of the Free Banking Era (1837) there were 712.


            Privately issued note, 1863
            During the free banking era, the banks were short-lived compared to today's commercial banks, with an average lifespan of five years. About half of the banks failed, and about a third of which went out of business because they could not redeem their notes.[2] (See also "Wildcat banking".)

            During the free banking era, some local banks took over the functions of a central bank. In New York, the New York Safety Fund provided deposit insurance for member banks. In Boston, the Suffolk Bank guaranteed that bank notes would trade at near par value, and acted as a private bank note clearinghouse.[citation needed]
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          • Posted by $ 1 month, 2 weeks ago
            Lincoln and Jackson fought the central banks...that is part of the picture.
            Yes, that is what we are told of Harding.
            What was interesting to me, and I had heard it before, that the act was never fully ratified by the states...only 4 states ratified the act...so how did they get away with that...many people/lawyers/judges know this...guess everyone likes the kool aid...
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  • Posted by $ Dobrien 1 month, 2 weeks ago
    This NESARA has been discussed for a few years on lots of alternative podcasts, and many are counting on it. I don’t carry any debt on credit cards but would love to see the Rothschilds and Rockefeller’s wealth used to payoff all who carry debt.
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    • Posted by $ blarman 1 month, 2 weeks ago
      To piggy back on that, I think that the Federal Reserve - and EVERYONE on their various boards - should have their personal assets confiscated to pay down the national debt they have inflated. That includes all the real estate they've been buying up like mad in the past couple of years.
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    • Posted by $ 1 month, 2 weeks ago
      I've had the feeling that I might regret paying off my debt and workin like a dog to pay off my morg.
      It would be just my luck that as soon as my morg is paid...everyone else's is forgiven!
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      • Posted by $ Dobrien 1 month, 2 weeks ago
        Truth is I always disregarded the NESARA discussions because it has a major flaw.
        I knew what the obligation was when taking out a loan of any sort. If they want to divide up the money and disperse it evenly I would be fine with that but to reward those who over extend their ability to pay for instant gratification would be a travesty. It is like a CEO who gets a bonus on increased sales for a company and then makes a large acquisition over paying for it and then taking his bonus.
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  • Posted by mccannon01 1 month, 2 weeks ago
    I'd like to see the elimination of property taxes as well. A citizen should be secure in his payed off home without any government threat of confiscation by assigning annual debt to the property owner.
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  • Posted by $ 1 month, 2 weeks ago
    The only one of the tenants that really bothers me is the 14% tax on anything new/ unnecessary, (no who determines THAT?),...but what we know and they don't, is that we are headed for the mother of all natural "Recycling" Cycles. No need to worry about resources...although, I would agree that we don't need to be building as many new cars like we do each year...many Japanize cars go unsold because they over produce.
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