11

Welcome to AmeriKa, where the competent are punished and the incompetent are rewarded

Posted by freedomforall 2 weeks, 3 days ago to Philosophy
36 comments | Share | Flag

"One of the most obvious expressions of this principle is on the road, where the law punishes competence as a kind of affront to the incompetent. If some people can’t handle making a right turn on red without creeping out in front of right-of-way traffic and causing a wreck thereby, no one else is allowed to make a right-on-red. If someone ignores the law forbidding it and makes a right-on-red safely and competently, by judging the flow of traffic and applying the necessary degree of acceleration to merge with it smoothly, he is punished for being competent.

For having ability – and daring to use it."
SOURCE URL: https://www.ericpetersautos.com/2020/10/06/welcome-to-bergeron/


Add Comment

FORMATTING HELP

All Comments Hide marked as read Mark all as read

  • Posted by $ Snezzy 2 weeks, 2 days ago
    "limit the progression of instruction of the bright kids to accommodate the dullest kids. ... It was called “mainstreaming.”

    That happened in 1954 in my school. The previous year there were three separate classrooms, each at a level appropriate to ability. Then in 1954 the kids were all mixed in together. Our teacher taught separate lessons to each of three bunches of kids. The bright bunch (Snezzy waves hand vigorously) were mostly left alone to do their work. The not-so-bright got more careful attention, and the "others" got remedial reading lessons. I think we all eventually learned how to read.

    By 1967, I was teaching 8th grade science at a city school, and students were grouped by ability. One of the "slow" group was a brilliant fellow who was a rebel. He rarely did any assignments, but when he did, he'd have answers we had not discussed in class. By that age, 13 or 14, the "brilliant" group were the most trouble, always interrupting. Student A hesitates, being unsure of the correct answer, and Student B yells it out, disrupting both A and the teacher. Hard to fault B for that action, which was exactly what I did or wanted to do when I was 14.

    I can see how some teachers and administrators eventually welcomed the psycho drugs that calmed down the unruly kids. Diana Moon Glampers, Kurt Vonnegut’s "Handicapper General," is in that pill.
    Reply | Mark as read | Best of... | Permalink  
    • Posted by $ splumb 2 weeks, 2 days ago
      Mainstreaming was implemented in Detroit in the late 60s, just before I started school.

      To pay for it, they scrapped the gifted children program. It did both groups a great disservice.

      The gifted kids were left to die of boredom (I was one of them, and it was soul-crushing boredom), and those poor retarded kids went to school every day with targets on their backs.

      From the group of geniuses who implemented busing in the mid 70s. Thanks a bunch. /sarc/
      Reply | Mark as read | Parent | Best of... | Permalink  
      • Posted by Idiocracy42 2 weeks, 2 days ago
        There was no gifted program for my son, either. He was bored with school throughout, after skipping through K-2. No parenting fun, having a kid who is bored at school.

        At home, he got an education... we spent the dinner hour and many long weekend breakfasts starting as a toddler-- playing with numbers (they are like magic), telling stories, discussing social security, etc. Whatever we thought about we just talked about. Just talk and play, nothing formal. He was doing long division at the age of 4. They booted him out of Kindergarten within a week, after they reported was he was beyond 2nd grade reading level.

        He read Dune at the age of 8.

        I don't know much about nature vs nurture when it comes to IQ, but this kid grew up to be a very well-adjusted, successful and, most importantly, a happy person.
        Reply | Mark as read | Parent | Best of... | Permalink  
      • Posted by $ Snezzy 2 weeks, 2 days ago
        I recently had the revealing opportunity to substitute for a "Special Ed" class, where the children were actually handicapped mentally to the point of not being suitable at all for mainstreaming. I wondered, going in, why THREE teachers were needed for a class of twelve kids. I found out. "Mrs. Jones," said one student, "Billy is having his problem." The other two teachers took care of Billy's seizure, while I watched the eleven others.

        Occasionally I feel as if we are all supposed to measure up to Billy's standard. Luckily most of the work my wife and I do in putting little kids up on our ponies involves families that are dedicated to helping their kids become better people. Billy's class helped me understand how to handle the rare situation where a difficult pony rider needs special attention.
        Reply | Mark as read | Parent | Best of... | Permalink  
  • Posted by shaifferg 2 weeks, 2 days ago
    My senior year of high school was not that boring. I had read most of the interesting things in the library
    by the end of my Jr. year so I majored in Perry Mason and E. S. Gardner, finishing one book and starting the next one. I had several conversations with the principal, who had earned my respect, asking for a Sr. year math class of calculus and a Spanish language sequence since it was more likely to be more useful than French. No luck for me but they added both the year after I graduated. I found my first challenging and interesting classes at the U S Army Artillery and Missile School, wondered why all H S classes couldn't be taught that well. With thanks to the people who taught me to read, and the math instructors that together gave me the education needed to succeed there. USA A&MS made life changing difference for me. Ended up teaching for 30 years using their model/methods as much as I could.
    Reply | Mark as read | Best of... | Permalink  
  • Posted by term2 2 weeks, 2 days ago
    I was bored to death in high school. Looking back on it, I am actually angry that I was forced to endure pretty worthless classes that never netted me anything. I learned more AFTER school in my home electronics and photography shop- completely on my own with a few books. Today, school learning is pretty much eclipsed by YouTube, where you can learn what YOU want to learn when you need it and your interest takes you.
    Reply | Mark as read | Best of... | Permalink  
    • Posted by JohnWesley 2 weeks, 2 days ago
      I am sorry you were bored. School should teach reading, writing, and arithmetic, and history. Today's schools spend time on everything else--look at the result.
      Reply | Mark as read | Parent | Best of... | Permalink  
      • Posted by term2 2 weeks, 2 days ago
        I made up for it after school where I developed my interest in engineering and electronics on my own. It was in the past, and I have forgotten it. If I had kids, which I didnt, I wouldnt want to send them to public schools at all. I would want them to learn what they wanted to learn, when they felt they needed it and it had relevance to their lives.
        Reply | Mark as read | Parent | Best of... | Permalink  
  • Posted by VetteGuy 2 weeks, 3 days ago
    I love this! Something to add to my reading list. I've said for quite some time that speed limits seem to be set for individuals driving oversized SUVs with their knees while holding coffee in one hand and a cell phone in the other.
    Reply | Mark as read | Best of... | Permalink  
    • Posted by $ 25n56il4 2 weeks, 3 days ago
      Now be very careful. I drive an 'oversize SUV' because you stand a better chance of not being squashed by a dangerous driver (more steel around you). And I don't drink coffee, talk on the telephone, or take my eyes off the road. I've never caused an accident. Have no tickets.
      Reply | Mark as read | Parent | Best of... | Permalink  
      • Posted by $ Snezzy 2 weeks, 2 days ago
        I'm usually hauling a horse trailer and do not have the luxury of getting above the speed limit. Instead I occasionally discover that behind me, perhaps for the last several miles of two-lane back road, the driver of a little red car has been trying to make me go faster by tailgating so closely that I could not see him. We think those drivers are hoping for some free fertilizer.
        Reply | Mark as read | Parent | Best of... | Permalink  
      • Posted by VetteGuy 2 weeks, 3 days ago
        I thank you for being a responsible driver. I wish there were more like us. I also don't drink or eat in the car, or talk on the phone, and out of self-preservation keep my eyes peeled for those less vigilant. I got run off the road by one just a week ago. Unlike you, I do have speeding tickets. As a result of being 'competent' as in the article above - I used to drive race cars, and still own a race kart!

        By the way, I also own a full-size pickup, so I harbor no ill will toward those who drive larger vehicles - only those who drive irresponsibly, which around here is typically SUVs (I think the 'extra steel' makes them feel impervious).
        Reply | Mark as read | Parent | Best of... | Permalink  
    • Posted by 2 weeks, 3 days ago
      Agreed! 👍
      They aren't any slower than 99% of people driving Accords and Camrys.
      The other 1% of people driving Accords and Camrys appear to want to make up for the 99% though (and they get punished unless they are very lucky.)
      ;^)
      Reply | Mark as read | Parent | Best of... | Permalink  
  • Posted by STEVEDUNN46 2 weeks, 2 days ago
    Me thinks the author got a ticket and has sour grapes.
    Reply | Mark as read | Best of... | Permalink  
    • Posted by 2 weeks, 2 days ago
      Could be true, and a situation that is common to many competent people.
      The author's site seems to have a theme against government interference in enjoyment of automobiles, so the article may not be due to a single incident.
      Reply | Mark as read | Parent | Best of... | Permalink  
      • Posted by $ puzzlelady 2 weeks, 2 days ago
        Considering the number of people killed in auto accidents each year, and that any numbskull can get a license, some caution on the road is advisable. Aside from drifting attention to food, phone, and finding places, fools in other cars may challenge reflexes and reaction times to sudden situations. Self-driving cars cater to diminishing capabilities. Are people actually getting dumber, or is there more and more to integrate? We are still basically mammals not conditioned to the ever-growing complexities of the world as it has developed, with nearly 8 billion diverse mental systems and sensory content. The slower ones left behind of course resent it. So it's easy for them to envy and to hate the smart as well as the rich for being "superior". Can one be superior without harming the inferior? Can the inferior be the best they can be without wanting to harm the superior? Is incompetence a character flaw or a result of natural selection? There are no quick answers, no tweet-size judgments. If there were, aside from the golden rule, we would not have wars any more.
        Reply | Mark as read | Parent | Best of... | Permalink  
        • Posted by VetteGuy 2 weeks, 2 days ago
          Regarding the first third of your post, I blame much of the problem on the fact that cars are 'too easy' to drive. Driving a typical car at the speed limit (especially on the interstate) is BORING! I know some people who rarely drive anywhere without talking on the phone. Even if they use hands-free, their mind is NOT on driving. It confuses me how few take the time to learn to drive well, considering that doing it poorly can get you killed.
          Reply | Mark as read | Parent | Best of... | Permalink  
        • Posted by $ Olduglycarl 2 weeks, 2 days ago
          When driving, like anything else, you have to be actively engaged. Although we 'sometimes' get away with having our minds active on something else...it's still not totally instinctive. The brain will do it's job for most but the mind must be aware of what the brain/body is doing.
          Think of all the times you weren't paying attention to Where you Put you Keys...Laughing
          Reply | Mark as read | Parent | Best of... | Permalink  

FORMATTING HELP

  • Comment hidden. Undo